17 comments

  • Mike HeitzkeMike Heitzke, over 7 years ago

    Of course it matters, design just needs to be a more intelligent process than many make it.

    Every design is a hypothesis, and without actual real data or testing behind it, it continues to exist as an educated guess. Design is a process, not a thing you make.

    6 points
    • , over 7 years ago

      I couldn't agree more Mike! Design cannot stand alone and should be part of a larger process.

      1 point
  • Savelle McThiasSavelle McThias, over 7 years ago

    The point of design, is to make money.

    Any technique, skill or way of communication that helps get you more money is useful. The timing of the release date, the verbiage on the submit button, the email confirmations, the way it's spread by word of mouth, the logo shapes, the corner radius on the lightbox, the font, literally every detail.

    http://52weeksofux.com/tagged/week_1

    1 point
    • , over 7 years ago

      Yeah, I would assume that the point of almost every product is to make money. As a designer I was just talking about what part design has within all the things you mentioned and many more that are part of the entire process of a product.

      0 points
      • Savelle McThiasSavelle McThias, over 7 years ago

        Yeah, your article deals with the transition from "experiential visual design" to modern agile type design. But, design in general is the entire process, every detail communicates something to the customer.

        0 points
  • Jingshu ChenJingshu Chen, over 7 years ago

    Nice article! It depends on how we define design. The pixel perfect visual design is just one layer of design. To my experience, it usually happens later in the design process when other parts like use case, IA and interaction flow are validated.

    1 point
    • , over 7 years ago

      Thanks Jingshu! I agree, if you wait to release a product only when it's 100% done (if there is such a thing) you have waited too long.

      1 point
  • Jon IzquierdoJon Izquierdo, over 7 years ago

    Great article Noam... I'm dealing with the same dilemma (where you were at the agency). It's really hard to put so much effort into a design and not be a part of it months later. I haven't made a jump (or return in my case) to focusing on a single product yet, but it's definitely crossed my mind. Everything you said really hit home. Thanks and keep writing great stuff!

    1 point
    • , over 7 years ago

      Thanks Jon! I'm glad you enjoyed it. Yeah, it's very hard to see something you put tons of thought and effort into just "disappear" in many cases without knowing anything about how it actually worked or if users liked it. And what makes it worse is that you won't know if things you thought would work actually did and learn from them.

      1 point
  • Ryan ODonnell, over 7 years ago

    Thanks for sharing this! I had the same feelings while freelancing and shared in your frustration.

    I suspect most freelance designers feel this way to some degree because "design as a process" is a tough sell to clients. That sort of work is typically only possible when you have the luxury of retainer contracts or maintenance agreements.

    I went on and created my own company (with a fellow freelancer) and there was certainly an adjustment period between my mindset designing as a freelancer and now designing for my company.

    0 points
    • , over 7 years ago

      Thanks Ryan, Congrats on the company! Have you felt that working on your own product has improved you as a designer?

      0 points
      • Ryan ODonnell, over 7 years ago

        Very much so. The feedback loop keeps me humble.

        Being so close to something, learning who the customers/users actually are, understanding the product/market fit and trying to stay true to that -- these are the experiences that shape me as a designer.

        0 points
  • Bevan StephensBevan Stephens, over 7 years ago

    Product/experience design matters. Always.

    Pixel perfect visual design however, doesn't always matter, it depends the users you are designing for and if there are many competitors.

    0 points
  • Chris AllenChris Allen, over 7 years ago

    "Aesthetic designs are perceived as easier to use than less-aesthetic designs." Or: people perceive things that look nicer as working better. Visual design isn't just for style points or impressing a client with "eye catching designs." Perception is everything; if a product appears or seems to work better, the user is happier whether or not their perception is valid. Ultimately the product/service is better for it.

    http://courses.washington.edu/art479/media/universal_principles1.pdf

    0 points
    • , over 7 years ago

      Thanks for reading Chris, I have no doubt that users connect better to things that are aesthetically pleasing, and i wasn't trying to advocate that we should design things that aren't just that. I was just trying to say that a product cannot be based predominantly on that.

      I definitely want my users to be happy, but a smile doesn't always translate into conversion. The design is there to make an emotional connection to the product but i don't think you can base the entire user experience just on that.

      0 points