39 comments

  • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, almost 6 years ago

    just as dumb as iOS style on the web.

    46 points
    • Renz BRenz B, almost 6 years ago

      This is the TL:DR

      2 points
    • Al HaighAl Haigh, almost 6 years ago

      How does this have so many upvotes? What does this even mean?

      5 points
      • Cihad TurhanCihad Turhan, almost 6 years ago

        Have you ever seen iOS styled website (except icloud site)? iOS Design is for ios devices so use them on device. Material design should be the same. It is good for android devices but we don't need them on the web

        0 points
    • Jeff EscalanteJeff Escalante, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

      Eh, don't agree at all. Any backing for this at all? Have you tried the google inbox web interface? It's truly glorious.

      Not that I think you should implement it on your own site, but for google services it works great.

      3 points
      • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, almost 6 years ago

        (disclaimer: i made the comment with the assumption that OP meant material design usage for non-google things. i hadn't had my coffee yet.)

        but personally, i don't the Inbox interface -- it feels very constrained by the style. hamburger menu is a gargantuan copout, bundles are less intuitive tabs, and the search lost a ton of its robust features. it's also sorely lacking a great deal of the layered, animated flair you come to expect with material design.

        not many other web interfaces are material yet... google drive, i guess. but those are too basic to have much of an opinion of.

        1 point
  • Nicolas PrietoNicolas Prieto, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

    "Material Design" is just a name, a group of styles applied to some elements on a mobile OS context and hyped by Google. I don't think it has anything to do with the web. Look, I can create a stylesheet for my designs, name it accordingly and pretend people will replicate it trough the web.

    In a closed/related environment, iOS guides and Android guides makes sense because you're looking for consistency between different apps that belongs to the same ecosystem.

    For web, why would you want to stick to a set of rules commanded by someone else? It doesn't make any sense to me. Specially if those rules are naive, they just look well on some scenarios, and pretend to be the "branding guide" of a company like Google.

    15 points
    • Alex BAlex B, almost 6 years ago

      I think the real thing to consider is, are there aspects of these design philosophies that we can use to strengthen the web, if so, how can we use them to evolve and improve how we interact with the web.

      But in all, you're right- these platforms design component libraries to promote consistency on their specific platforms and by extension, in their web applications. The web does not have this luxury/limitation, and if it did, who would design such a thing? There are already many conflicting UI libraries out there such as the popular Twitter Bootstrap that attempt some consistency but in reality, it would be an impossible thing to police or to have everyone agree on a single way of doing things. We can't even agree on a browser.

      0 points
  • Matt SistoMatt Sisto, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

    You say "web" but I assume you're talking about large screens; desktops, laptops, etc... So I'll roll with that:

    For the past 3+ years, I've worked on web-based healthcare apps that are used in both a clinical setting, as well as by patients at home. Now that I only spend a fraction of my time working on "websites" (in the traditional sense), I have noticed a shift in how I approach all projects.

    As we've begun transitioning our apps to fully responsive UIs, I've found myself preferring a scaled-up version of the "mobile" UI on my laptop screen. Less and less do I find myself creating responsive views with significant differences between small and large screens.

    It sounds cliché at this point to say it, but Google seems to actually be creating a seamless experience across apps and devices. Their willingness to put users in a position where they are forced to re-learn a decade+ of problems previously solved by established convention might seem irresponsible and/or unnecessary, but it clearly demonstrates how much confidence they have in the idea. Not only is it bold, but I think it is critically important that a company with this much influence makes a move like this. Speeds things up. Sets the bar higher for everyone else when thinking about "experience".

    Time will (and really is the only thing that can) tell, but I applaud the move.

    Oh, and I think the charisma translates.

    6 points
  • Clark WimberlyClark Wimberly, almost 6 years ago

    lol at discussing mobile and web like they are two different things

    5 points
  • Barak AvidanBarak Avidan, almost 6 years ago

    I don't like it at all. It sometimes looks nice but the usability isn't worth it. Every time they use the rounded button as CTA, I can't seem to find it. I don't think it's natural to look for the action button on the bottom right corner of the screen.

    5 points
    • Abhijeet WankhadeAbhijeet Wankhade, almost 6 years ago

      I agree with you.

      0 points
    • Martin LeBlancMartin LeBlanc, almost 6 years ago

      I would argue that the round CTA with a plus has nothing to do with material design. It's a certain implementation of a CTA that was presented by Google, but has nothing to do with emulating materials in the UI.

      It's a horrible button and should not be used on the web where most users still have fairly large monitors. Just write with a text and add an icon on a regular button!

      1 point
  • Sam GarsonSam Garson, almost 6 years ago

    Material design, in its essence, isn't a set of rules on which colours to use and where to use drop shadow.. It's a set of design principles for better UX.

    The 'web' and 'mobile' shouldn't be considered two separate entities—UX is UX and these days you're just as likely to be browsing a site on your phone as you are an app... As always, use what's appropriate for the job, and learn from as much as possible.

    3 points
  • Lance Gutin, almost 6 years ago

    I think there's a lot to learn from Material Design. Specifically, the references to real-world solids and the use of light and shadow to communicate context.

    I think we'll see it's influence over time on the web, just like iOS has influenced things (eg Twitter web interface).

    3 points
  • Samuel MarksSamuel Marks, almost 6 years ago

    I had a similar discussion over here.

    Basically,

    Whenever I see a new implementation of Material Design for the browser, it just doesn't seem right. It seems out of place, like it doesn't belong on a website. I'm wondering if I'm the only one with this opinion.

    3 points
  • Martin LeBlancMartin LeBlanc, almost 6 years ago

    I think it's a great step away from the pancake flat style that has been hyped. It gives the designers a lot of ways to tell the user where he is, the information hierarchy and what is clickable.

    2 points
    • Sacha GreifSacha Greif, almost 6 years ago

      Wait, isn't that exactly what we were all doing anyway before that flat design stuff?

      8 points
    • Nicolas PrietoNicolas Prieto, almost 6 years ago

      I agree with Sacha on this. "Material Design" shouldn't be the one thing that gives designers a way to tell the user where he is, hierarchy and what's clickable or not. That is Design. Why a pre-set of rules about branding, element styles and position should be our guide to creating better websites? I don't get this "Material Design" conversation, it doesn't make any sense.

      1 point
  • Charlie McCullochCharlie McCulloch, almost 6 years ago

    I think Google clearly has a business interest in encouraging others to make the web look more Google. There are strong usability reasons why a native mobile app should behave and look like it belongs on that device, but the same is not true for websites.

    1 point
    • Abhijeet WankhadeAbhijeet Wankhade, almost 6 years ago

      Every time I tried to implement that style on web, it took my designs back to the 'huge dropshadow' era. I always thought I was doing something wrong.

      0 points
    • Will MorrisonWill Morrison, almost 6 years ago

      I think Material Design on the web should be implemented - but only on Mobile versions / Chrome Apps.

      The reason Google wants Material on the web is so that it's Android Phones / Tablets and Chromebooks will all have the exact same interface (which looks great, on those devices.) So if your website has an android version / general mobile version, I think Material is a great idea.

      Additionally, Material has some really good principles and ideas that have been lost in the past few years, so borrowing a little bit of this and that from Material isn't always bad.

      However, as long as the web runs on many different browsers, on many different devices, all of which have a different style - you can't simply decide on one style for the web.

      Use Material if you're working with Android / Chrome OS, or if you just like it, but if you aren't/don't - Just don't use it. Any style will look good to certain people, just try to find the best style for your website.

      2 points
  • Suganth SSuganth S, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

    The web is unique. there is no strict guidelines or outdated design. There is no yearly upgrade. Each site has its own style guide. I think thats what make the web special. If you apply material design or iOS design, it might look good, but it will reduce its value. its no longer unique.

    1 point
  • Dani Guardiola, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

    I think it does... I actually did a framework and a webpage for the framework... Take a look at it, it is responsive and looks great in both desktop and mobile.

    It's named Paperkit, http://paperkit.datatrends.es/

    0 points
  • Jodi WarrenJodi Warren, almost 6 years ago

    My grumpy opinion is that it'll feel similar to the wave of non-designers using Bootstrap in lieu of actually considering the design of their website/app.

    0 points
  • Alex BAlex B, almost 6 years ago

    There is the additional concern of trying to use a consistent way of working with mouse + keyboard interactions as with a touch screen.

    0 points
  • Ariel VerberAriel Verber, almost 6 years ago

    Most of the sites trying to implement "Material Design" all look the same to me. They don't have their own brand and style.

    When it's google it's okay, inbox really looks great and right, even in the web. but most websites trying to be 'material' look just like another product by google.

    0 points
  • Stefano TirloniStefano Tirloni, almost 6 years ago

    It's not so bad but I found a lot of lacks... sometimes the UI seems too much childish, sometimes is too much animations oriented and on larger screens don't look so good as mobile ones.

    0 points
  • Jeff CouturierJeff Couturier, almost 6 years ago

    For Google, it's great... But for non-Google folks to use it for a client project? Hell no. That is no different than attempting to use Microsoft's style guide for a site you're designing for Nike. Why on earth would to do such a thing?

    Learn from the design principles of Material, sure. But do not regurgitate its complete look and feel. It is not a universal style guide, it's Google's style guide. Remember that.

    0 points
  • Tyson KingsburyTyson Kingsbury, almost 6 years ago

    although I agree with most of you about the usability aspects, i sure do love the colors....

    0 points
  • Renz BRenz B, almost 6 years ago

    I think it's okay. Sometimes pages feel/look empty but most of the time they look stunning. Typography is very clear, although CTA's are not THAT emphasized. But I do really think Material Design fits best on mobile. Button placement & animation, seems more fitted for finger use (eg floating buttons on the bottom corner of pages).

    0 points
    • Will MorrisonWill Morrison, almost 6 years ago

      I think, perhaps, if Google focused a little more on Desktop implementation, and altered some elements that work good on Mobile but bad on Desktop, so that they work well on both, Material Design would have increased usability on the web.

      0 points