19 comments

  • Sacha GreifSacha Greif, over 5 years ago

    I don't get it. Isn't it a lot of work to render an object this realistically, even using a photo as a base? What's wrong with acknowledging the effort?

    Or is the implication that there wasn't any extra work done and the shot is just the actual stock photo? (because it doesn't look like it…).

    6 points
    • Eric H.Eric H., over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

      In the case of the toaster, it is the exact same photo. The Dribbble'd version was then photoshopped to clean up the "toast chambers" and add the floor/shadow and logo.

      For the teapot, also the exact same photo. There was a very subtle scale on the y-axis to make it seem slightly different. If you perform a y-axis scale on it, you can make it match 100% in every detail.

      So, for those two at least, you have what appears to be mild photoshopping being presented as highly polished illustrations or renderings.

      However, the points about the community vs competition seem somewhat valid. Most of the comments are cheering sections and not constructive or useful at all. Perhaps if Dribbble introduced karma (like on HN or here) that would improve the content AND the discourse.

      Regardless, I still enjoy much of the content and surf it for inspiration from time to time. I've never been invited, so I rely on the keyword search and bypass the tabs (and commentary) altogether.

      0 points
    • Andrew LiebchenAndrew Liebchen, over 5 years ago

      I have to agree with Sasha. These seem like 3d renders. The modeling itself takes time. Setting up the model for the render is difficult and time consuming. This is skilled work, even if it is a rehash of an existing photo.

      I see the endlessly repeated shot of the glass of coffee or alcohol on Dribbble as a kind of proof of skills...just as a sculpture demonstrates his or her chops by carving stone to look like fabric, or like Giotto drawing a perfect circle freehand.

      0 points
    • Jon GoldJon Gold, over 5 years ago

      It's just dull Photoshop manipulation - I think I got jaded by DeviantArt 10 years ago though :)

      2 points
      • Andrew LiebchenAndrew Liebchen, over 5 years ago

        Did an overlay of the images, and I suppose you're right. The Bourbon glass though, that's a render...its kind of a repeated trope on Dribbble...a right of passage for talented Russian renderers.

        0 points
  • Aaron SagrayAaron Sagray, over 5 years ago

    Dribbble reminds me of all of the people who were posting isometric pixel graphics in the late 90s, when k10K was the go-to site for vanity design.

    5 points
  • Al HaighAl Haigh, over 5 years ago

    Mock up a sweet looking flat UI, twizzle the perspec, whack it on an abstract'y background, blur it up, noise @ 2%. Boom.

    4 points
  • Martin GlassMartin Glass, over 5 years ago

    Wow. Is this real? I can't find the shots on dribbble.

    1 point
  • Stephan JunghannsStephan Junghanns, over 5 years ago

    remindes me of one of my all time favs: http://visualidiot.com/articles/dribbble

    1 point
  • Marcus EdvalsonMarcus Edvalson, over 5 years ago

    The mechanics within Dribbble are broken. You can throw up a great shot, but unless you have over a thousand users, there is no chance it ends up on the popular page, and chances are it doesn't get many more views than you have followers. Dribbble confuses me.

    1 point
    • Matt FloresMatt Flores, over 5 years ago

      I only have a couple friends and got a few shots on the popular page, receiving over 100 likes. You just have to post what they like. For example, a flat ui iphone app or something.

      0 points
      • Marcus EdvalsonMarcus Edvalson, over 5 years ago

        Perhaps. I am basing this only on my personal experience on Dribbble. My debut shot was the most popular, because it ended up in the debut section, which gets traffic. Everything after that you see the number of views go way down. It seems like a chicken and egg thing to a certain extent. You need traffic to your shots to get traffic. There is also a distinct possibility that I just haven't put anything up there to like. This is, in fact, likely. :)

        0 points
      • Samuel FineSamuel Fine, over 5 years ago

        For clarification: we (Dribbble) don't manually select shots for the Popular page. That page is generated by an algorithm that looks at a number of different factors, all driven by the community.

        2 points
    • Sacha GreifSacha Greif, over 5 years ago

      The main point of Dribbble is improving your own skills, the likes are just a corollary. In other words, it doesn't really matter if the mechanics are broken or not, because they shouldn't be what motivates people (just like karma alone shouldn't be what motivates you to post good links here!)

      2 points
      • Martin BavioMartin Bavio, over 5 years ago

        But then what's the point of using Dribbble? I mean, if I dont care about likes, why wouldn't I just put my work on Behance or Cargo, or even my own portfolio? I mean, I dont see the sexyness of showing how I improve my skills in a reducted amount of pixels.

        1 point
  • Kyle A Kyle A , over 5 years ago

    I personally don't see why everyone get so fluffed over Dribbble. It has it's good and bad factors. But it all depends on how you use it. People whine about what gets on the popular page but claim that they aren't in it for the likes. This seems a bit hypocritical to me.

    I simply do what I am good at or what I want to do. I have a good fan base as a result and I get good feedback. I'm not worried about building popularity but gaining it isn't a bad thing either. We are technically in an "entertainment" profession after all.

    Here is my profile if you want to harass me- http://dribbble.com/itskyleadams

    0 points
  • Natalia Khlebova, over 3 years ago

    It strongly depend from your followers number. Some people use http://fffollow.com for boosting followers.

    0 points