39 comments

  • Francesco BonomiFrancesco Bonomi, almost 7 years ago

    Wish I could try it out before giving them $150...

    10 points
  • Adam DebreczeniAdam Debreczeni, almost 7 years ago

    Hey guys, I'm a designer on Form. Happy to answer anyone's questions.

    4 points
    • Kelly SuttonKelly Sutton, almost 7 years ago

      Congrats on the release, Adam. Been seeing some murmurs around this tool for awhile. Cool stuff!

      0 points
    • Denis SmirnovDenis Smirnov, almost 7 years ago

      Hi! Congrats on the release! Am i right, that the prototypes cannot be imported in xcode, just like QC projects? Or will they? If yes, 150$ seems a reasonable price.

      0 points
  • Account deleted almost 7 years ago

    I was part of the beta test - It's a pretty phenomenal tool. If anyone has questions I'd be happy to answer

    3 points
    • Taron GhazaryanTaron Ghazaryan, almost 7 years ago

      This seems like a great tool for prototyping custom interactions. Would you say it can also be used to prototype an entire navigation flow similar to Flinto?

      1 point
      • Account deleted almost 7 years ago

        Definitely sits closer to Quartz/Framer in the Micro interaction arena. You can definitely string together big flows but I find myself working mostly with Micro stuff in Form.

        3 points
  • Paul BestPaul Best, almost 7 years ago

    Any plans to support Android device(s) in the near future?

    2 points
  • Matt ThomasMatt Thomas, almost 7 years ago

    This reminds me of QuartzComposer, which Apple never took advantage of IMO

    2 points
    • Patrick NeufmillePatrick Neufmille, almost 7 years ago

      Looks exactly like Quartz, but with a more user friendly UI.

      0 points
      • Adam DebreczeniAdam Debreczeni, almost 7 years ago

        The paradigm (node-based, functional, visual programing) is the same. The underlying architecture is completely different. The compositions run on the device, not on the Mac. Because of this, you have access to anything the iOS gives you (accelerometer, camera, multi touch, etc.)

        2 points
    • Bart Claeys, almost 7 years ago

      Looks great! Has this recently been released? Seem to come out of nowhere...

      0 points
  • Jodi WarrenJodi Warren, almost 7 years ago

    Wow. That's stunning. Not only is is a great tool for designers to build quick interactive mockups, but it's potentially a great tool to teach people programming concepts.

    Great work guys, really great.

    1 point
  • Stephen MeszarosStephen Meszaros, almost 7 years ago

    Yeah, can't believe there isn't a trial version. I have a lot of questions but mainly, is Facebook and Origami supporting the power behind? It looks exactly like, and has a lot of the power of Origami/Avacado.

    1 point
    • Adam DebreczeniAdam Debreczeni, almost 7 years ago

      Mentioned this above.

      Working on the trial right now.

      It's different from Origami/Avacado as it's not built on top of QC. The compositions run directly on the device.

      0 points
  • yofred moikyofred moik, almost 7 years ago

    Quartz Composer is a little clunky to use, so this would be welcomed. However, I'm definitely not paying $150 for this without any reviews/trial version. Disappointed because this shouldve been obvious to the makers, and dont want to see this fail at launch.

    1 point
  • Dave Crow, almost 7 years ago

    Is there any sort of trial version available?

    1 point
  • brad wrage, almost 7 years ago

    Looks like no browser support? Only devices?

    0 points
  • Jeff CouturierJeff Couturier, almost 7 years ago

    Oof, gotta fix the quality of that background video guys. It looks terrible: http://cl.ly/image/0G1R2V371A3m

    And your price point is... insane. I think you're on to something good here, but you're not going to get much traction at that price. It's way too high.

    0 points
    • Bart Claeys, almost 7 years ago

      The pricing is far from insane. To compare to other software in the same industry: Macaw costs $180, Sketch costs $80, so $150 is a normal price. I would gladly pay the $150 if it proves to work better than Quartz Composer (which has tons of inconsistencies and bugs that wasted already more than $150 of my time).

      1 point
      • Jeff CouturierJeff Couturier, almost 7 years ago

        I decided against Macaw for myself and my entire team because it was too pricey.

        Sketch was within reason, so we have that, but there is no comparison between Sketch and Form. They're dramatically different applications, with Sketch being far more versatile and useful.

        0 points
        • Bart Claeys, almost 7 years ago (edited almost 7 years ago )

          I don't know where you're based Jeff and what you charge per hour, but if you compare the price of these software packages to a standard hourly rate of an agency it is neglectable. Plus the assumption is that these packages speed up your output, and thus saving you money in the long run.

          If you have a front-end dev team that works much faster with Macaw (or Sketch or Form), and creating delight while working with it, then it's a small price to pay.

          It's also not fair that you consider Sketch more useful than Form, that is extremely subjective. With the output of Form (or Quartz Composer) I can probably close a million dollar deal much easier than with just some static comps from Sketch... This is just one example on how to calculate value.

          Plus Sketch is not necessarily cheap. For major new releases they charge you again... The question is how Form will deal with upgrades and how fast these upgrades will follow each other.

          0 points
          • Jeff CouturierJeff Couturier, almost 7 years ago (edited almost 7 years ago )

            Form is iOS only. When over 50% of the mobile market is Android, and we design and build across all platforms, it makes zero business sense to rely on a tool that can only design for iOS when there are alternatives that are (1) cheaper, and (2) output cross-platform. To give them credit, they say they're working on other platforms. When those are available, I'll take another look.

            It's also not fair that you consider Sketch more useful than Form, that is extremely subjective.

            Again, they are drastically different applications. Form is a prototype tool, while Sketch is a full-feature design tool that can easily be used for prototypes, mockups and final design. Sketch and Form are just not on equal footing in terms of features and function. When it comes to prototypes, we use HTML+CSS, or tools like POP and get excellent results, and great client feedback.

            My pricing issue with Form is not an issue of tight purse strings, but of value. I don't think it provides enough value to be worth that price. Sketch (although still a drastically uneven comparison, but I'll refer to it again here to address your comment) has proven it's value repeatedly, and I'd gladly pay for an upgrade because of that.

            I agree that providing the right tools for my team is very important - they get literally whatever they want. They don't want form for the reasons I've outlined, and neither do I.

            Side note:

            standard hourly rate of an agency it is neglectable

            "Negligible" is the word you're looking for, rather than "neglectable."

            0 points
  • Alaxic SmithAlaxic Smith, almost 7 years ago

    this looks pretty GOAT (greatest of all time). I'm downloading the trial now, coming in handy for our iOS 8 app update.

    0 points
  • Ryan DRyan D, almost 7 years ago

    FYI, the scrolling on the product page is unpleasantly janky for me in Chrome.

    0 points
  • David BlumDavid Blum, almost 7 years ago

    Let's know when a free trial is available.

    0 points
  • Dennis Camacho, almost 7 years ago

    Looking forward to the Free Trial. I can't wait to try it out. Great work guys!

    0 points
  • Matt FeltenMatt Felten, almost 7 years ago

    So I don't do any iOS work right now, but can someone explain this to me. Does this actually export the... front-end?.. that can then be worked into an app? Or is this purely just for visualization, like Balsamiq or something, that you then have to build in the app?

    0 points