6 comments

  • Cihad TurhanCihad Turhan, over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

    I don't know what is the origin of [x] but I know the origin of the hamburger icon

    Image alt

    7 points
  • Robert PalmerRobert Palmer, over 5 years ago

    With no mention of NextStep ... about four years ahead of Windows 95, but three years behind the Atari example.

    NextStep 1.0

    6 points
  • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, over 5 years ago

    Great, well researched article. Love seeing all the old UI screenshots. :)

    1 point
  • Tom WoodTom Wood, over 5 years ago

    Superb research! Thanks for this.

    Ties in with the Hamburger debate. There was a time when X was a "new" concept. Fast forward 20 years and it's so ubiquitous that you couldn't even imagine a time when it didn't exist, much less conceive an alternate symbol for "close".

    There may equally become a time when the same can be said of the hamburger.

    0 points
    • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, over 5 years ago

      There may equally become a time when the same can be said of the hamburger.

      I’d argue we’re close to that now. I’d also argue that when there’s only a few buttons on screen, the icon itself may not matter that much, as long as it looks like a tappable/clickable element — given no other choice, most users will explore.

      2 points
  • Shawn BorskyShawn Borsky, over 5 years ago

    I appreciate how this is just a study of the advent of the "x" UI convention and not an attack or attempt to re-design it.

    0 points