44 comments

  • Account deleted over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    Looks familiar...

    Relative Wave

    23 points
  • Calum SmithCalum Smith, over 7 years ago

    "Logos on front of devices should be banned" literally right next to a picture of a logo on the front of a device...?

    14 points
  • Peter MainPeter Main, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    This is quite top level branding – I'd like to see less focus on the logomark itself and more of a holistic view of the brand/culture itself. I'm not convinced the solutions shown actually solve the problems you mention.

    13 points
  • Darth BaneDarth Bane, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    Colour palette

    I mean of course it looks cleaner if you remove the mandatory CE marking and things like serial numbers.

    EDIT: I will never understand how you embed images here. Copied and pasted the markdown, no go.

    EDIT: I take it back. I now know the secret.

    7 points
  • Robin RaszkaRobin Raszka, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    Okay, Samsung's problems with current branding (that most people would easily recognize btw) are: "Plastic" and "Copycat".... hm. There must be a (good) reason why they are 9th most valuable global brand I suppose.

    Dude, nice practice (which is good for you!) but this is complete rubbish. The symbol is weak, too thin and the I-have-seen-this-before-somwhere kind of style.

    5 points
    • Todd SielingTodd Sieling, over 7 years ago

      hm. There must be a (good) reason why they are 9th most valuable global brand I suppose.

      Yes, because they capture the low end of markets defined by others (namely the ones they consciously copy).

      1 point
      • Robin RaszkaRobin Raszka, over 7 years ago

        I highly doubt this is the reason my friend.

        1 point
        • Todd SielingTodd Sieling, over 7 years ago

          I don't. They've taken a strategy for low-end and they've done well with it. It's a viable and legitimate strategy (except the copying), and enough to fuel their success in the last few years.

          You can have decent quality at low end, it just means that they price themselves at a point that is the low end of the market, trading per-device profit margin for a wider segment of the market.

          3 points
    • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, over 7 years ago

      They are that valuable of a brand because they cover way more than the products shown here. They even make skyscrapers.

      But in regards to their electronic devices their reputation IS plastic and copycat.

      Also calling something "complete rubbish" without any decent constructive feedback is not very nice.

      1 point
  • Ryan Duffy, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    Way too many of these re-brandings going on these days.

    5 points
    • Benjamin MouchBenjamin Mouch, over 7 years ago

      I think creating these re-brandings are okay though. It is purely a thought exercise, and if the designer has fun creating it then all the better. The designer gets the opportunity to try something out on a larger scale, and there isn't much harm in that. Now if we want to talk about how too many of the re-brandings get picked up on various design blogs etc. when there is a lot of incredible design out there that is actually implemented in the real world, I am all in on that. :)

      5 points
  • Art VandelayArt Vandelay, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    Think this looks good.

    Have a few questions though -

    1. Feels as though some inspiration may have come from Andrew Kim's Microsoft redesign
    2. How did you consider the cultural implications of this redesign. While we know Samsung as a technology brand, it also impacts like 2/3 of the South Korean economy and produces more than electronic goods for the country. How would this impact anything from cars to wigs to fish import/export (all things samsung either does now or has done in the past throughout South Korea's history)?
    5 points
  • Mitch WarrenMitch Warren, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    Wow, there's a lot of knee-jerk negativity here.

    I enjoyed reading through your work, Aziz. Nice job!

    4 points
    • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, over 7 years ago

      Seriously. I know we designers are an opinionated bunch, I certainly am, but I'm also nicer about it.

      Constructive feedback people! No this person is not going to ACTUALLY redesign a major brand, this is for FUN and LEARNING!

      0 points
  • Colm TuiteColm Tuite, over 7 years ago

    Love the mark, really clean and distinctive. Great work.

    I'm not mad about the colors though, not sure why. I think they're just too banal. Or maybe they're just too intense. They might be too playful also. It kinda feels like a "Summer range".

    I'd like to see more exploration on a deeper level of things like the website, brochures etc.

    4 points
  • Sacha GreifSacha Greif, over 7 years ago

    Having an opinion on the actual redesign is one thing, but I really don't get people saying you shouldn't even try to redesign a brand.

    I'd like to see someone try an Apple redesign just to see what kind of reaction that would get…

    2 points
    • Ryan MurphyRyan Murphy, over 7 years ago

      Something can be pointless, I don;t have to do something to realise it'd be pointless.

      Should Apple redesign, it'd probably take close to 100 designers over a year. So to think one person could do it, during a weekend is moronic.

      It's nïeve to assume you (not you) could do a redesign of such a huge brand. So the results will always yield a superfluous, top-level wishy washy result.

      Pick something smaller, something more targeted, maybe something more in need and do it right.

      0 points
      • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, over 7 years ago

        Comments can be pointless too. Complaining about someone sharing their design work, rather than providing constructive criticism or just saying nothing at all is pointless. Just don't up vote it, there is literally zero benefit in making a person feel bad about the specific thing they chose to do a design experiment on.

        Of course in real life one person would never redesign a major brand over a weekend, but that doesn't mean there is zero merit to playing around with some aesthetic ideas.

        I used to draw spaceships that would never have worked in reality and I would show them to my friends, should I not have done that because I am not a rocket scientist and I could be spending time drawing things I could really make?

        1 point
      • Sacha GreifSacha Greif, over 7 years ago

        So the results will always yield a superfluous, top-level wishy washy result.

        Tell that to Andrew Kim.

        0 points
  • James De AngelisJames De Angelis, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    "Note: This project doesn't reflect Samsung's views or plans"

    Do. Some. Research.

    What kind of rebrand in no way takes the company's values, aspirations or beliefs into mind to create something meaningful? When you have no context about what or who you're designing for, is that even design anymore? It becomes beautiful noise.

    Honestly it's hard to be constructive or positive with these projects. At least have a point of view beyond "it's cleaner now".

    2 points
  • Moeed MohammadMoeed Mohammad, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    If you're an editor or writer from a tech blog, please I beg you don't feature this. Please.

    Thank you.

    2 points
  • Account deleted over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    You need to work on typography too. It looks like SA MSU NG. kerning. Kerning kerning kerning.

    2 points
  • Ray MartinRay Martin, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    Good approach, but the first thing I thought of was Zune.

    2 points
  • Brian A.Brian A., over 7 years ago

    This one causes a lot of conflict for me. On one hand, I like that you thought in terms of uniting the brand under a consistent voice. On the other hand, this is such a radical departure from the current brand that I'm having a really hard time with it. Maybe it's because Samsung is such a recognizable brand... either way, I like the exercise, but the change feels awkward.

    What if you were to utilize the current lopsided circle-jawn to form the structure of the shape you created? I think that would lend some familiarity if combined with the primary blue color.

    (all bow before my incredible sketching abilities)

    Lil Sammy

    2 points
  • Victor WareVictor Ware, over 7 years ago

    I think you did a good job identifying problems. The solution, however could use more work.

    2 points
  • Louis BLouis B, over 7 years ago

    I think everyone's being a bit too hard on you. I take it like there wasn't too much thought, any lower than superficial anyway.

    I'm into it, I like the idea of unifying the products a bit more.

    I don't really like the logo but then I don't think Samsung would do a logo we all like, so that's kind of realistic.

    1 point
  • Jacob BuckJacob Buck, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

    S brings minimalistic design

    "minimalistic" is not a word, and that isn't minimalist design.

    0 points
  • Ryan MurphyRyan Murphy, over 7 years ago

    I nearly pissed myself when I saw the Chelsea shirts.

    0 points
  • Laurie JonesLaurie Jones, over 7 years ago

    One small gripe: Those football shirts are wrinkled, the logo should be too.

    0 points