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Git Tower 2.0 released (git-tower.com)

over 6 years ago from , Location independent consultant | Trying to live a good life with less stuff. Building software along the way.

22 comments

  • Clay MacTavishClay MacTavish, over 6 years ago (edited over 6 years ago )

    I've said this before but the faster you get away from Git GUIs the better developer you'll become. The learning curve for many tools become less steep. You will be able to work with a team of developers easier, run into less bugs and find more solutions in documentation (you'll usually see a StackOverflow answer in the form of a CLI) , and believe it or not work much faster.

    There are many more reasons for learning your way around any CLI versus using a GUI version of an app. However, the main one being the enormous power and control you will have using a CLI.

    Learn the command line.

    4 points
    • Fabricio Rosa MarquesFabricio Rosa Marques, over 6 years ago

      Learning the basics on the command line is definitely a good thing.

      That being said, GUIs help you both become more productive and make fewer mistakes. No one likes to inspect a complex project history on the command line. Getting a visual representation of a conflict helps you resolve it more confidently. Automatically having local changes stashed away prevents problems... There are indeed many scenarios where a GUI is plain helpful - for beginners and pros alike.

      2 points
      • Clay MacTavishClay MacTavish, over 6 years ago (edited over 6 years ago )

        I understand the virtues of a GUI. They do provide a low barrier-to-entry into an environment, per se, however, with huge consequences. Short term or long term. I my experience (and I'm just some guy on the internet) it has handicapped front end developers tremendously.

        Nobody has ever become proficient at anything by not making mistakes. It is par for the course. This is how you become better at anything.

        "Automatically having local changes stashed away prevents problems..." Not sure what you mean here. Tower automatically does this? In that case I'd highly advise not to use use it. When your app starts making design, development, and/or deployment decisions for you is when you've begun to handicap yourself in a potentially dangerous way.

        0 points
        • Fabricio Rosa MarquesFabricio Rosa Marques, over 6 years ago (edited over 6 years ago )

          "Automatically having local changes stashed away prevents problems..." Not sure what you mean here. Tower automatically does this? In that case I'd highly advise not to use use it. When your app starts making design, development, and/or deployment decisions for you is when you've begun to handicap yourself in a potentially dangerous way.

          No, it doesn't do it straight away automatically but rather gives you a short notice when you're about to pull new commits (& your working copy isn't clean) — You can still decide what to do and even adjust the default behavior to whatever you'd like it to be, so no "magic blackboxing" involved here :)

          CLI vs. GUI is a debatable topic and I don't think that there's a clear winner, both lines of thinking have valid arguments. I definitely support your argument that one should have spent some time on the CLI to get into GIT and using the CLI in general, but using it on the long run is where it gets tricky. Speaking of our current user base (Which largely consists of developers) I can reassure you that there are a lot of people out there who just don't like using Git@CLI (Although they're doing C/Obj-C/Java/etc. all day long) for various reasons. A random (but still related) quote that comes to mind (Obj-C guy who mainly works on large OSX/iOs Software projects): "I didn't work with convenient development interfaces for years in order to switch back to the CLI for git" (Maybe the translation isn't perfect, he wrote it in german ;)).

          1 point
  • Tobias ReichTobias Reich, over 6 years ago

    Finally a Git-client that's beautiful, functional and not only for GitHub! Fantastic app. Goodbye SourceTree …

    2 points
    • Oliver ChankOliver Chank, over 6 years ago

      Frankly, they look really similar.

      Also, SourceTree is not GitHub only, and is completely free.

      So how is Git Tower fantastic and not SourceTree?

      0 points
      • Fabricio Rosa MarquesFabricio Rosa Marques, over 6 years ago

        I think this is something everybody can decide for him/herself by downloading the free 30 days trial and taking it for a spin. As I've already mentioned, people who prefer Tower (2) over Sourcetree mainly do so for its UI/UX. We've put a lot of thought into making it feel 'home' on OSX and how to make the App comfortable for both git beginners and pros alike.

        0 points
      • Tobias ReichTobias Reich, over 6 years ago

        SourceTree crashes once a day, is crammed with functions/options, looks very ugly (personal opinion) and annoys the user in some points. E.g. you need to wait each time you commit, because there's an UI-blocking popup. Beside this downsides, the app is great. Tower is like SourceTree, just without those issues.

        0 points
    • Chris ColemanChris Coleman, over 6 years ago

      Even GitHub.app can be used with any remote, not just GitHub.

      0 points
  • Gonçalo MoraisGonçalo Morais, over 6 years ago

    I’m still stuck with $ git.

    1 point
  • Nikhil SwaminathanNikhil Swaminathan, over 6 years ago

    Good job - its useful for people who don't know how to use git on the command line, which I still believe is the quickest.

    1 point
  • Sam McQueenSam McQueen, over 6 years ago

    Has anyone used both Git Tower and SourceTree? I use SourceTree daily, just wondering how the two compare and whether it's worth the extra $$?

    1 point
    • Fabricio Rosa MarquesFabricio Rosa Marques, over 6 years ago (edited over 6 years ago )

      Hey Sam, we're offering a free 30-day trial, so just check it out and decide for yourself weather it's worth the extra $$.

      As the designer working on tower further comments on the comparison of tower vs. source tree might be a bit biased, but I think most people that chose Tower over Sourcetree prefer our approach in regard to user interface, workflows and usability.

      We offer service accounts integration (github, beanstalk, bitbucket, etc.), a visual conflict wizard, auto-fetching (in the background) and very thought-out workflows in general. Tower goes a long way to make using Git as easy and comfortable as possible. Plus, we also aim to make it look and feel as native as possible on OS X :)

      We also had designers in our (closed) beta and many reported that they also feel like having more control over their repositories and getting a better understanding about how git works. By using tower they actually started using git features such as line staging or stashing.

      We've posted 2 introductory clips about Tower 2 on youtube:

      Hope that helps!

      1 point
  • Tom HareTom Hare, over 6 years ago

    This looks like a massive improvement on an already fantastic app. Hat tip for the upgrade pricing too. Great work.

    1 point
  • Fabricio Rosa MarquesFabricio Rosa Marques, over 6 years ago

    Thanks a lot for sharing! If you guys have any feedback or questions I'd be happy to hear it.

    1 point
  • Florian Bürger, over 6 years ago

    Congrats to my friends at fournova for the release. The new version is awesome.

    (Disclaimer: I worked for them some time ago

    1 point
  • Jitendra Vyas, over 6 years ago

    Question to Git Tower 2.0 users. Have you tried Sourcetree 2.0

    https://blog.sourcetreeapp.com/2014/09/25/sourcetree-for-mac-2-0-released/

    0 points
  • Ciriac TrompCiriac Tromp, over 6 years ago

    Fantastic work as always from the folks at fournova.

    0 points
  • Spencer BombermanSpencer Bomberman, over 6 years ago

    A nice feature of the previous version of Tower (and even more previously, most SVN clients), is the ability to browse the entire repo and instantly see info about the last commit of each file (e.g., date, author).

    That seems to be missing in this version. There is a Tree view of the repo for each commit, but it is cumbersome to both browse files AND see when files were changed. Has anyone seen such a feature in Tower 2 or other GUIs?

    0 points