12 comments

  • Daniel SpronkDaniel Spronk, almost 6 years ago

    I think the hour estimates are way off ( a lot more hours to produce quality work), and therefore the price ranges are off too.

    11 points
    • Bruno BarrosBruno Barros, almost 6 years ago

      Yep. Hour estimates are totally wrong. It seems insane to me someone can make a good logo in 10 hours. That means there's no real research involved in the process.

      Actually, I believe price grids like this does not make things more transparent. Actually, it makes things more confusing since it causes misinformation. Design is a complex activity and different designers work differently. Putting price ranges on grids is ignoring the complexity of our profession.

      2 points
      • Adam SelbyAdam Selby, almost 6 years ago

        He does make a point to mention this at the opening.

        The budgets do not include copywriting, research, content strategy, and other kind of preparatory work; it’s assumed that this has either already been taken care of by the client (hah!), or is budgeted separately.

        0 points
    • Bruno BarrosBruno Barros, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

      (I posted 2 times by accident. Sorry.)

      0 points
    • Bruno BarrosBruno Barros, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

      (I posted 3 times by accident. Sorry.)

      0 points
    • Sacha GreifSacha Greif, almost 6 years ago

      What are they "way off" from? Do you mean they're way off for you?

      0 points
      • Chris NewtonChris Newton, almost 6 years ago (edited almost 6 years ago )

        The hours of work as shown might be a little optimistic in some cases, but they don’t seem wildly unrealistic to me if they are intended to represent effort required, meaning time actually spent at the keyboard, on the phone, etc.

        However, IME the kinds of jobs described here tend to be done in several short bursts of activity, often with significant gaps waiting for client feedback in between. The elapsed time required would therefore be significantly higher for this kind of work, and any pricing policy would need to allow for that.

        0 points
  • Dominic JacobDominic Jacob, 6 years ago

    I'm glad something like this is about. It is always helpful when there is more transparency on pricing.

    2 points
  • Sacha GreifSacha Greif, 6 years ago (edited 6 years ago )

    Previous thread: https://news.layervault.com/stories/26600-show-dn-im-working-on-standard-pricing-tables-for-freelance-designers

    For those saying prices are too low: please leave a comment on the document and I'll bump them up where applicable.

    And for those saying these grids are pointless: the amount of interest around this document (which contains completely made-up numbers based on no research whatsoever past my own experience) shows there's real, tangible questions around design pricing.

    So these grids might not be the perfect solution, but if they at least get a debate started then in my opinion it's already a step in the right direction.

    1 point
  • Aaron GrandoAaron Grando, almost 6 years ago

    I feel like the coding numbers are pretty low, which seems to be based (unclear) on an extremely short timeline, even at "expert" levels. $5k for a non-responsive front-end Web App build is only 50 hours at $100/hr, which is a pretty average rate for a front-end expert. I'd pity the dev that only budgets themselves 50 hours for a web app build.

    And nowadays, anyone worth anyone's time is including responsive in all builds -- this shouldn't really be an add-on charge.

    1 point
    • Alex JohnAlex John, almost 6 years ago

      Sorry to be that guy but what would you recommend a freelancer charge per page for implementing HTML, CSS, and some light JS. Responsive of course.

      0 points
      • Aaron GrandoAaron Grando, almost 6 years ago

        Depends on your expertise, experience and the market you're working in. And the client, ha. Per page is rough to estimate, too - it's really not a way that you should bill.

        I'm a senior-level full stack developer in New York (not a freelancer by trade, though - I have a full time job and sometimes do side work). Assuming I was doing work directly for a small business (say, a retail store?) and not an agency or a larger company - I'd probably try to work for somewhere around $80/hr. BUT. I wouldn't make it an hourly charge - I'd break down the elements of the site, estimate the time I'd have to spend on each (not just a blanket "per page" charge) and multiply by my rate.

        I say "try to work for" because, with all things, YMMV. Get ready to negotiate your rate. Stick up for yourself but also keep your client's business in mind. You can always say no if they are unable to pay you reasonably.

        When I started doing freelance gigs in my free time, I lived in Philadelphia and charged roughly $40/hr. Each project I worked on, I increased my rate by a few bucks, up to where I'm at now. I've tried to set my rate at the amount of money which I'm happy to work for, for which people will still pay me. The increases reflect that I've had to feel out how I think much my time is worth.

        Really recommend reading Mike Monteiro's Design is a Job which has been super influential to me, and has a chapter about finding your rate.

        2 points