14 comments

  • Casey BrittCasey Britt, over 7 years ago

    I still like the hamburger button.

    11 points
    • Clay MacTavishClay MacTavish, over 7 years ago

      Agreed. I don't understand all the hate. It works and doesn't get in the way.

      1 point
      • Adrian HowardAdrian Howard, over 7 years ago

        I don't understand all the hate. It works and doesn't get in the way.

        The reason for the hate is that repeated testing by different groups of people show that it doesn't work very well compared to other options. The OP pointed to some of these results.

        0 points
        • Clay MacTavishClay MacTavish, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

          "...different groups of people..."

          Facebook, Twitter, Google? I don't use their metrics to decide how I am going to design my app/website. Maybe if I were on the dev team at these places it would make sense.

          What makes sense for Facebook won't always make sense for Google or anyone else.

          0 points
        • Casey BrittCasey Britt, over 7 years ago (edited over 7 years ago )

          The more designers use it, the more successful it will be. This is the way its been since the beginning of time. No one knows that a red octagon is a stop sign intuitively. However they encounter them so frequently that they understand what it means.

          The same could be said for radio buttons. People had never encountered a radio button before the rise of computer forms, but now most people understand that a set of circles on a form where one is filled means that I can only select one option.

          I think the hamburger stands the best chance of becoming an international symbol for menu. In this regard, I still like the hamburger. Perhaps it goes away eventually, perhaps it stays. For now I'm onboard for willing it into ubiquity.

          0 points
  • Shawn BorskyShawn Borsky, over 7 years ago

    I feel like a lot of the commentary on Hamburger buttons is well founded but its getting little repetitive. Although, I have to say, I think just like the carousel argument it is bad to make sweeping "This is bad UX" commentary. It may be bad when used improperly but these controls evolved to solve problems and in some cases they work well. The alternatives like the example "Everything" drop-down is only a slight different form of the "Hamburger". In most cases, any menu exposed by an icon is functionally the same.

    Certainly, showing the customer the appropriate options rather than hiding them is good but I think given sufficient complexity, it is never as simple as many of these articles seem to imply.

    7 points
    • Drew BeckDrew Beck, over 7 years ago

      "In most cases, any menu exposed by an icon is functionally the same." Very true.

      Also note that the "Everything" pattern works well in the G+ case because you're choosing different views or filters for the content below. It's a very different structure from an app or site that has multiple distinct views with different functionality on each.

      0 points
      • Adrian HowardAdrian Howard, over 7 years ago

        "In most cases, any menu exposed by an icon is functionally the same." Very true.

        Very not true! Depending on what you mean by "functionally the same" of course ;-)

        Yes — if you mean there if you click on this are a menu appears it's the same.

        No — if you think you will get the same results. Because many, many more people will understand what "menu", or engage with a tab bar, than understand what "☰" means. As study, after study, after study has shown.

        I have never seen a hamburger menu perform better than a more descriptive button/link/tab bar. I've never seen anybody report seeing a hamburger menu perform better than a more descriptive button/link/tab bar.

        If anybody has any evidence that they work well I'd love to see it ;-)

        0 points
        • Shawn BorskyShawn Borsky, over 7 years ago

          "Functionally the same" has more to do with the "Out of sight, out of mind" nature of the menu. The recommended alternatives to the hamburger are not usually "just add Menu" -- thats a compromise. The current "fix" is to show navigation that can be read without exposing.

          0 points
  • Mitch Malone, over 7 years ago

    Facebook, Twitter and now Google moving away from this design clearly shows us that the hamburger button isn’t doing good with users and its time to evolve.

    So just do what Facebook, Twitter, and Google do. Forget your own customers' behavior and needs. Got it.

    3 points
  • Michael FarleyMichael Farley, over 7 years ago

    It's not clear if the author is against the icon or the drawer.

    Like Casey said, people will recognize and learn a new pattern, and we have data that shows how to design the icon/button to indicate interaction is available. The problem is trying to stuff everything under the sun into that drawer. The problem is content strategy.

    The author has obviously written this with "hamburger bad" in mind, and tries to use a couple of examples to prove it. What he's really proving though, is that we need to distill our menus down to a clear, succinct focus. Our pages or views need to be on point, and help to direct to the next logical step.

    Once we can get that together, an icon representing a navigation is less important, as users stop requiring said navigation.

    1 point
  • Al HaighAl Haigh, over 7 years ago

    Yet to see anyone critique the hamburger button (and slide out drawer navigation) in the context of a responsive website. All of the examples focus on mobile apps. How should we treat navigation on a responsive website with up to a dozen nav items?

    1 point
    • Chris ColemanChris Coleman, over 7 years ago

      Thank you!

      All of these focus on apps. Have app designers grown accustomed to a bubble where everything fits into five tabs across the bottom of the screen?

      I'd love to see a better alternative for web sites, but none of these critiques seem to even be thinking beyond apps.

      0 points
  • J VJ V, over 7 years ago

    Great, two examples to prove a point and both are wrong.

    On the G+ app, the ≡ button was just moved to the right, next to the notifications. The dropdown menu for "Everything" is just replacing the header "All" from the iOS app, that had a dropdown indicator but users didn't perceived it as interactive.

    Also, he is claiming that there's no ≡ button on the Yammer app when it's the last icon under the label more. Yes, it's on a nav tab, but the behavior is exactly the same.

    ≡ solves a lot of hierarchy and clutter issues. The whole point of the original article was to aware designers that people are not yet familiar with hidden menus on web services, not that you should get rid of the ≡ on mobile apps.

    1 point