16 comments

  • Jim NielsenJim Nielsen, over 3 years ago

    Some things you just can't reduce to numbers.

    3 points
  • Matthew Harris, over 3 years ago

    That sucks, I was looking forward to that redesign :|

    3 points
  • Aron RotteveelAron Rotteveel, over 3 years ago (edited over 3 years ago )

    This blog might not be the exact way things played out: https://medium.com/p/ed75a0ee7641 (post by Julie Zhuo, product design director @ Facebook).

    Dustin makes a few assumptions about the rationale behind the redesign, including how some of the beauty and cleanliness of the initial version tested a year ago was discarded for the sake of short-term metrics. I thought it’d be helpful to shed some light on the real reasons why the design has evolved.

    3 points
  • Beth DeanBeth Dean, over 3 years ago

    Dustin Curtis is a person with a lot of opinions about design, whose designs have never been seen beyond Svbtle, which let's be honest, is just un-designed Tumblr. Let's stop giving weight to what he says.

    2 points
    • Alex TebbsAlex Tebbs, over 3 years ago

      Dustin has been around for loooong time and before Svbtle used to run a very well designed blog @ http://dustincurtis.com/ ... Each post had custom layouts and stylesheets similar to http://visualidiot.com/. Unfortunately it's no longer up, but I can assure you there is a history behind why his posts move to the top. His secrecy and ego are a little over the top, but he's respected for a reason.

      0 points
      • Beth DeanBeth Dean, over 3 years ago

        Well designed blog is not the same as a product with a proven track record in the market. So you can design something for yourself, great, but can you solve anyone's actual business problems? Pretty important when you're critiquing other companies' solutions to their problems that you don't understand.

        0 points
        • Alex TebbsAlex Tebbs, over 3 years ago

          Yeah sure, <0.1% of us here work on products that are anywhere near the scale/caliber of Facebook, Dustin included. You can make that argument about many critics. Just wanted to let you know that while you can't find his older work online right now (which is a shame), he does have a history of doing good and respected design work beyond Svbtle.

          The funny thing about the article is that he doesn't really share his opinions on design or "business problems" anyway, he's just relaying information from unnamed sources inside Facebook. Not sure what to make of that.

          0 points
    • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 3 years ago

      you don't know who dustin curtis is?

      0 points
      • Beth DeanBeth Dean, over 3 years ago

        He is a person with a lot of opinions about design, who as far as I can tell doesn't know a lot about solving business problems, or at least has no work anywhere proving he does.

        0 points
  • Chris BraccoChris Bracco, over 3 years ago

    Such is the fate of companies who go public. Generating less revenue does not make shareholders happy.

    1 point
    • Jim SilvermanJim Silverman, over 3 years ago

      i don't think the problem is that they've gone public. all companies, public or private, eventually need to grow their revenue. there's nothing wrong with that.

      the bigger problem here is that ad-driven revenue kills user experience.

      9 points
    • John FlynnJohn Flynn, over 3 years ago

      I think this is too wide a net to cast. The bigger problem here is that Facebook has one product and can't balance usability improvements here with added revenue elsewhere.

      I think the more interesting conversation to have within the DN community is: what do you do when the numbers fly directly in the face of design?

      6 points
  • George ChenGeorge Chen, over 3 years ago

    The alleged quote can be applied to Google or any other "data driven company as well".

    0 points
  • Adrian HowardAdrian Howard, over 3 years ago

    I have to admit I'm unconvinced.

    For example - I vastly prefers the newer design.

    Yes, the larger images were nice to look at - but they got in the way of actually viewing the content for me.

    My personal newsfeed viewing habits is to give facebook a glance over with my morning coffee. My purpose is to get an overview - quickly. The old "new" newsfeed got in the way of that, especially when viewing in smaller windows.

    Not to mention all the folk who aren't looking at it on large displays.

    Sure - maybe there's a metrics issue too. But I've seen more than my fair share of usability tests where things that my "design" persona liked ended up being disliked by the people who actually use the site.

    Without insights into qualitative measures it's hard to say who's right.

    0 points