Design with Sketch (medium.com)

over 3 years ago from , Design+Code

27 comments

  • Kyle CaseKyle Case, over 3 years ago

    Is there a trick to exporting SVG in Sketch? My SVGs never turn out they way they are supposed to. This has prevented me from using Sketch for my day-to-day work.

    3 points
    • Kevin LetchfordKevin Letchford, over 3 years ago

      Compared to illustrator, sketches svg just feels broken the few times i have tried to use it.

      0 points
    • Meng To, over 3 years ago

      From my experience, if the shapes are really complicated (with shadows and a lot of Combines), then it will likely break. But simple shapes should be fine. All I can say is that keep trying and find what went wrong. It's worth it.

      0 points
  • Daniel FeldtDaniel Feldt, over 3 years ago

    Well, I'm going to give it a try. Thanks for the read Meng!

    3 points
  • Adam Brace, over 3 years ago

    I've really wanted to use Sketch, I think ill introduce it into my workflow for personal projects. However, I think the biggest roadblock right now for me is using it in the office with a diverse staff. It wouldn't take too much to get the design team on board but a lot of our developers use our PSD's, telling them to use and learn Sketch is perhaps too much to ask, does anyone have any experience integrating the software into large multidisciplinary teams?

    2 points
    • David McGillivrayDavid McGillivray, over 3 years ago (edited over 3 years ago )

      Yes, I've done so at my last two jobs, I've used Sketch professionally now for about 18 months. Whenever I show sketch to a developer they fall in love with it - it talks their language much better than photoshop, it talks in pixels and things that are closer to code. And because it's so dirt cheap I've been able to buy 10+ man engineering team a license with no pushback from finance departments. I've never had any real pushback once they see how easy it is to use and that there's essentially no learning curve for the average person.

      1 point
    • Meng To, over 3 years ago (edited over 3 years ago )

      +1 David M.

      Sketches does speak the same language as developers. It uses the same properties for borders, colours, gradients, shadows, etc. It's also incredibly focused on those things alone whereas in Photoshop, people have to find them in a sea of options.

      I don't think you'll find much resistance. on the contrary, people are more likely to want to learn design after they try out Sketch. :)

      0 points
    • Osandi Sekoú, over 3 years ago

      I've been asking developer-pals this lately. I think it is a matter of inquiring how developers actually use those assets.

      For example, I asked a front end developer how he retrieves the assets and prefers that they are organized. He's not afraid of photoshop, but would rather stay in his IDE as much as possible.

      I gathered that he simply uses Finder with Command+I for the file's properties. From there he's able to quickly assess what size the asset is and go to work.

      I was able to think of three other work arounds while in a single chat session that would make his life a lot easier.

      If you haven't already, just sit down and see what it is your team accesses, how they use it and chances are there is a way to provide them the same asset or content using whichever app you prefer.

      I will say that working with Sketch will make going back to Illustrator and Photoshop more painful than the other way around.

      When you've found out a work flow, let me know what works. And if this is helpful, do share.

      2 points
    • George PapadakisGeorge Papadakis, over 3 years ago (edited over 3 years ago )

      Whenever I am pushing for changes internally (in the company, that is), I always find myself yelling "This is NOT [enter previous state here]".

      Inertia is fine and all, but it's not change's best friend.

      When I started pushing the team from AI and PS to Sketch they always compared it to working with the Adobe products.

      That's the main bottleneck.

      Sketch, in its own way, introduces a new way of doing things. One you have to be a bit patient and willing to experience.

      Once you do, Sketch will be the go-to app for far more things than drawing stuff.

      For me, it's the closest thing to working on paper. And that's amazing.

      2 points
      • Adam Brace, over 3 years ago

        Thanks all for all the great feedback. We have quite a large site redesign project coming up soon, it would be a great time to sit down with the developers to see if sketch can help streamline a responsive design workflow. Cheers

        0 points
  • Michael Dorian Bach, over 3 years ago

    Excellent write up. Picked up some good tips. The seems buggy at times though. Does anyone experience the same visual glitchy-ness?

    2 points
  • Maciej ZadykowiczMaciej Zadykowicz, over 3 years ago

    Thanks Meng, good article. I see a lot of resemblance with my own experience with Sketch, started a year ago with some growing pains but now can't imagine UI design without it. In that time I've managed to convert a 10+ product design team with the help of your resources. There's still a long road ahead of them but I think it's safe to say, Sketch is here to stay.

    2 points
    • Meng To, over 3 years ago

      Sketch definitely had its ups and downs. But quite frankly, that's usually the price to pay for learning new tools before everyone else. I guess I learned to navigate around those small issues because the advantages far outweigh the hurdles. And as we speak, they're cooking up great features such as Smart Objects. They're still listening.

      Getting designers and non-designers to use Sketch was surprisingly the easy part. Can't say the same about Photoshop.

      1 point
  • Toby KellerToby Keller, over 3 years ago

    Excellent roundup. Background blur and Grid duplicate are sorely missing from Illustrator. They're definitely getting closer to the point where I'd consider making the switch…

    2 points
    • Meng To, over 3 years ago (edited over 3 years ago )

      I must say that I work more with Illustrator than ever before since I moved to Sketch. I use it to export Icons and illustrations, sometimes from Photoshop's shapes. A lot of resources are still only available in PS and Illustrator so I have to export them to SVGs first. Thanks!

      2 points
  • Tom WoodTom Wood, over 3 years ago

    I use Sketch every day for work and couldn't imagine having to create the same mockups in Photoshop. I would never ditch Photoshop, but its use is much more as either a finishing tool for client work or (as it says on the tin) for photos. Like Meng, using illustrator is part of my every day workflow, I still find it unbeatable for creating custom shapes and little icons. I do wish though that Sketch was able to handle Illustrator imports a little better - either bringing in the associated colour and/or bringing in the same path points. No doubt Sketch is a formidable tool, and is always improving but I was interested to read Justin from Pinterest's comments on the subject - and how he thinks we have a long way to go and neither Sketch nor Photoshop are 'it'.

    1 point
    • Michael Dorian Bach, over 3 years ago

      I totally agree. Illustrator is still much better for creating shapes. I wish the importing was better. Many times I just have to resort to exporting out of illustrator as a PNG and importing that. Not totally ideal.

      0 points
    • Meng To, over 3 years ago

      As with any new tool, when you get down to the nitty gritty, you'll find things you'll have to work around and things that save you a ton of time. For me, the later speaks louder.

      Oh I think Sketch is "it". I have one happy year of design to prove it. But that doesn't mean that we won't see better tools that will come after it as the landscape of design changes. If tools don't adapt, they will become obsolete.

      Illustrator is very good at what it does and more. I don't think that will change any time soon. Until perhaps Sketch catches up.

      0 points
  • Tom WoodTom Wood, over 3 years ago

    I use Sketch every day for work and couldn't imagine having to create the same mockups in Photoshop. I would never ditch Photoshop, but its use is much more as either a finishing tool for client work or (as it says on the tin) for photos. Like Meng, using illustrator is part of my every day workflow, I still find it unbeatable for creating custom shapes and little icons. I do wish though that Sketch was able to handle Illustrator imports a little better - either bringing in the associated colour and/or bringing in the same path points. No doubt Sketch is a formidable tool, and is always improving but I was interested to read Justin from Pinterest's comments on the subject - and how he thinks we have a long way to go and neither Sketch nor Photoshop are 'it'.

    0 points
  • Dharmesh PatelDharmesh Patel, over 3 years ago

    I use sketch on mac, but is there any similar tool for windows? What about online tool?

    0 points
    • Meng To, over 3 years ago

      I think Photoshop is the only way to go on a Windows machine. Would be nice to see independant teams start a project like Sketch on Windows though.

      1 point
    • Toby KellerToby Keller, over 3 years ago

      IMO Illustrator is much closer to Sketch than Photoshop is. Illustrator also has some downsides, but if you want a fast vector-based design tool, give it a shot.

      0 points
      • Dharmesh PatelDharmesh Patel, over 3 years ago

        I use photoshop. Tried Illustrator before and it seems complicated tool compare to sketch. Any web app?

        0 points
        • Frad Lee, over 3 years ago

          I think Sketch is more powerful in design of Mobile UI and Web Page than Illustrator, and nowadays Adobe CC is pay for subscription monthly. Sketch is much cheaper.

          0 points
  • Frad Lee, over 3 years ago

    Are you living in HongKong now? Meng.

    0 points