33 comments

  • Robin , almost 4 years ago

    My favourite part of this post was when you made a clear argument backed up with solid facts instead of just spamming a load of animated gi....wait

    9 points
  • Mike AndersonMike Anderson, almost 4 years ago

    Ryan—I agree in principle. The tough thing is this: take the site you're planning on shipping, remove the scroll down, and put it in front of a 50+ year old. I've never seen one person above that age assume to scroll without an indicator of some sort.

    6 points
    • Erik LevitchErik Levitch, almost 4 years ago

      Why not improve the design so it indicates more content is available?

      6 points
    • Will MinerWill Miner, almost 4 years ago (edited almost 4 years ago )

      I thought this was more a gripe against obscuring content/length of the page rather than the words "scroll down". If you have to tell the user to do something as fundamental as scroll...maybe you've already failed?

      9 points
      • Alex JohnAlex John, almost 4 years ago

        This is the issue. Full page images with some title text leave users wondering what to do next. They look pretty but designers need to give some kind of indicator on where the user should go. Instead leaving the next section visible would indicate that there is content below.

        1 point
      • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, almost 4 years ago

        If you have to tell the user to do something as fundamental as scroll... maybe you’ve already failed?

        BAM.

        Scrolling is a fundamental concept for the web, so you want to have a really, really, really good reason to hijack scroll behaviour.

        Scroll hijacking was my #1 gripe with 2013’s web trends. Please — I BEG YOU ALL — let’s not do that crap again in 2014.

        17 points
    • Ryan Mack, almost 4 years ago (edited almost 4 years ago )

      I was moreso speaking to the sites which deliberately take up the full window height for the first 'frame' of the 'show/presentation’ and a general gripe on them.

      In my experience, it puts too much focus on the mechanics of my mouse and detracts from the content and my experience. Here’s an example: http://fixedagency.com/ It’s a lovely site, but relying on the users' scrolling mechanism to properly display and tell your story/message/content throws all of it up in the air and you’ll never truly know if it was received the way you intended it to be, if at all. And no, hijacking is not any better in my opinion.

      I find this a little similar to our not-so-long-ago Click Here problem, which we’ve gotten a lot better about. Small cues or nudges are okay, but I think there are better approaches other than saying “Scroll Down.” If you’re going to do your scrolling animation show, maybe try phrasing it a little different? Give the user a better idea of that they’ll get by scrolling. Perhaps even a simple “Learn more” with an arrow is more friendly and helpful than telling me what to do next.

      I also just wanted to make you scroll through all those fun gifs.

      4 points
    • Mario Borna MjertanMario Borna Mjertan, almost 4 years ago

      I think text is a bad idea, after all, a grandma probably doesn't know the term scrolling, but it should be indicated somehow. Maybe a down-pointing arrow?

      0 points
  • Jian Wei LiauJian Wei Liau, almost 4 years ago

    What about replacing the text, "scroll down" with an arrow? :|

    4 points
  • Julian LloydJulian Lloyd, almost 4 years ago (edited almost 4 years ago )

    My experience has shown younger (or more technically savvy) users tend to experiment, attempting previously learned behaviors in the absence of clear direction (e.g: attempting to scroll, swipe or click suspicious elements).

    Whereas older (or more technically challenged) users tend to look for cues/direction on how to proceed; they are less confident, and subsequently, less likely to experiment.


    I don’t think there’s anything wrong with conspicuous and clear cues for desired behavior, such as an arrow with "scroll for more". I’d go as far as to say, this is exactly what designers need to be doing more of.

    Functional and easy to understand design is beautiful too, and easier to learn, use and share. I believe a slightly more utilitarian approach to web/ui/ux design would benefit our community and users.

    TL;DR — If there’s any doubt, how does a small nudge/cue that you can scroll hurt your design?

    4 points
    • Erik LevitchErik Levitch, almost 4 years ago

      This is a myth. What is your experience? Usability testing? Watching users? I'd like to know.

      0 points
      • Julian LloydJulian Lloyd, almost 4 years ago (edited almost 4 years ago )

        Let me be clear, I’m not a man to posture or assert truths. I’m simply sharing my experiences.

        I’ve silently observed many people (clients, friends and family) use various websites and apps, some of which I’ve been a part of building. I’ve also managed more deliberate user testing, where some direction or context is provided.

        In virtually every instance when a user knows they are being watched/recorded and/or is expected to give feedback, this primes them and results in (what I‘ve come to call) the "curious critic" mindset. This user, regardless of technical proficiency, reliably has an increased motivation to experiment—but is typically more judgmental. (This can be hell with clients, if you don’t target their focus.)

        In more natural environments however, I’ve found—as stated before—younger and/or technically savvy users are far more inclined to experiment, and subsequently learn new behaviors much faster on their own.

        Purely anecdotal, but my mom still hasn’t figured out how to use auto complete in Google search—even while staring directly at it as she types out the exact phrase of the top match. My 8 year old niece however, picked it up almost immediately.

        If you have experiences that suggest something different, please share.

        3 points
  • Clark WimberlyClark Wimberly, almost 4 years ago

    Because saying "scroll down" with words is any less clear than indicating it with design?

    Pffffft.

    2 points
  • Mike AndersonMike Anderson, almost 4 years ago

    What do you think about this example: http://nautil.us ?

    2 points
    • Ryan Mack, almost 4 years ago

      If getting the person to see and learn more about Issue 008 "Home" is your primary goal, then it seems fine to me.

      1 point
  • James Young, almost 4 years ago

    Until I switched to Mac last year, I'd have agreed because on Windows, the OS design includes a sensible and useful bit of UI help and it's the fact the scrollbar is visible by default.

    I assumed this was simply standard but found that for some retarded reason Apple hide the scrollbar so there's no immediate indicator more content is available hence people probably feel the need to indicate there's more content available with a crude indicator like an arrow or scroll text.

    As for designing your content better to indicate there's more available .. good luck testing that on a million different screensizes.

    2 points
    • Tom WoodTom Wood, almost 4 years ago (edited almost 4 years ago )

      ^ This

      Totally agree. I swtiched to a Mac in September, and had never realised they hid the scrollbar. Sure it looks nicer, because the scroll bar is rather ugly, especially on Windows, but the ability to immediately ascertain whether scrolling is available by either a greyed out scroll bar or a blue scroll bar is 2nd nature and a wonderful affordance.

      I dislike sites saying "Scroll Down" but merely from an aesthetic point of view, it's just not pretty. But I don't agree that it has failed simply because it's got a line of text on it telling you what to do.

      We all need a little help sometimes, and a friendly indicator like "Push/Pull", "Slide to open" or "Twist to open" can make things easier.

      2 points
    • Lucas BebberLucas Bebber, almost 4 years ago

      Because iOS, I guess. OS X had a scrollbar up to Snow Leopard.

      0 points
  • Lucas BebberLucas Bebber, almost 4 years ago

    There are far worse things to do - scroll hijacking easily among the worsts.

    2 points
  • Moeed MohammadMoeed Mohammad, almost 4 years ago

    In other words ... "Ya blew it".

    1 point