• Nathan HueningNathan Huening, over 7 years ago

    Thanks for sharing. Few notes:

    I think a few people need reminding that Sketch is not a replacement for software like Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign etc.

    It is entirely a replacement for Illustrator, if one used it for vector graphics and digital illustration. Certainly not a replacement for Photoshop -- can't use a vector drawing tool to replace a bitmap one: one still needs a bitmap editing / painting tool. For that, we have Pixelmator, which can entirely replace Photoshop in almost all cases.

    Workflow looks like this:

    1. Generate raw assets: copy (Ulysses), bitmap graphics & photos (Pixelmator), video (Final Cut / After Effects), illustrations (Sketch).
    2. Assemble raw assets into an interface using a screen compositing tool (Sketch). Export finished assets.
    3. Code for publication (Sublime Text).

    Same process for everyone; your mileage may very. Pick the tool that works best for you and remember that not all tools are the same and just because it works for you, doesn't mean it's a superior tool. That shit is actually objective.

    Sketch a [sic] vector design tool created by and for a group of people who want to design interactive screen-based elements, not flat, print-based elements. Yes, you can use it for print design, but the print designer is not the target market (at least, for now).

    You can't use it for print design: it doesn't permit graphics with resolutions above 72dpi. 300 dots per inch is the minimum for print work.

    Just read the name: Photoshop. It just happens to be suitable for designing websites, but I don't think that's what it was designed for.

    No need to "think" -- it was explicitly not designed for that.

    It's no wonder that Bohemian Coding can waltz onto the scene, throw together an app in a couple of years and massively improve productivity of many screen designers. They had the benefit of years of watching people turn Adobe's products into web design tools when that wasn't their original aim.

    Actually, Adobe's existing efforts had only marginally to do with it -- they utilized system level OS X APIs available to all Mac apps like Core Text, Core Animation, Core Draw, etc. It's a big reason why Sketch is Mac only (Pixelmator too) and can "waltz in" and match Adobe feature for feature; the BC team isn't saddled with maintaing a giant legacy mess of spaghetti cross-platform code.

    Apart from that, I'm not sure how much learning they had from Adobe -- just look at how radical a departure Sketch's UI and workflow is.

    You're right: Adobe isn't going anywhere, and that was never the idea. I suspect nobody wants Adobe to go anywhere: the more tools we as makers have, the better. But Sketch & Pixelmator most definitely are having a competitive impact and that benefits everybody. No way in a million years Adobe makes this web site if not for Sketch's popularity:

    http://www.photoshopfordesign.com

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    • Dan HoughDan Hough, over 7 years ago

      Thanks for the notes and corrections. I'm glad you agree, in general.

      Specifically, I didn't know you couldn't go above 72dpi in Sketch. You can still make some seriously huge images though which will print nicely.

      It is entirely a replacement for Illustrator, if one used it for vector graphics and digital illustration.

      In the sense that it isn't really useful for print design I think it is not a replacement for Illustrator, since Illustrator can easily be used for print.

      Apart from that, I'm not sure how much learning they had from Adobe -- just look at how radical a departure Sketch's UI and workflow is.

      I think it's possible they learned how not to do it from Adobe.

      Also,

      No need to "think" -- it was explicitly not designed for that.

      I was covering myself in case anybody found something somewhere quoting someone from Adobe saying that it was designed for that :P

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