• Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, 2 years ago

    Why are all these tools so focused on animation now? I need a tool that lets me lay out web designs faster and more reflective of actual web technologies. How many websites or even native apps do you have that have this many full screen crazy animations happening all the time? If I was a developer I would be terrified that all of a sudden designers are going to be coming to me with ridiculous animations that take forever to code or simply can't be done in a performative manner on the web without a ton of work.

    Does Studio have a 9-point reference tool that lets me measure, move, and resize things relative to a corner OTHER than the top-left?

    Does Studio have hover, focus, etc states? Can we easily mock up inputting text data without faking a keyboard? What about making an element sticky once it reaches a certain part of the page?

    Does Studio allow content to resize parent containers? Can I have containers that flow and wrap like Flexbox?

    I get that animation is sexy, but none of these design tools have even the basics that Illustrator has had for years when it comes to actually putting shapes on the page (not asking for Illustration tools), and none seem to be introducing anything that goes beyond the Sketch basics.

    I mean am I crazy to want :hover styling BEFORE full page animation transitions? Is that so much to ask?

    9 points
    • Norm Sheeran, 2 years ago

      I think most tools in this bracket tend to be focused on mobile native app design so hover events don’t exist.

      I totally agree on your point about animation, but I guess it has the cool factor that is sure to impress a client. In my opinion any animation on UI should be used sparingly.

      1 point
      • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, 2 years ago

        That's my problem with a lot of the stuff Invision does. It's super clean and looks great, but it feels like it's all catering to some kind of corporate design team or convincing a product manager to buy the software.

        2 points
    • Andrew C, 2 years ago

      These animations are all based on CSS animations... so on web it would barely be a blip on performance so long as the layout method was used properly (up to the tool to do that).

      For mobile, though, you may have a point. iOS uses a literal physics engine to do their shit. Not sure how well CSS will translate to that.

      0 points
      • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, 2 years ago

        Sure you can theoretically do most of this with CSS animations, but when you can animate a bunch of absolutely positioned stuff nicely in a single artboard it is very different from animating elements in a variable size browser window and have it look nice for everyone.

        Also once you have enough animations, or more complex animations, performance can be an issue even with using only opacity and transform animations.

        Regardless of implementation, I want a tool that actually understands the environment I'm designing for. I'm thinking of switching to Webflow for a lot of web design stuff, but then it isn't cross compatible with more absolutely positioned design work.

        1 point
        • Andrew C, 2 years ago

          You have to start somewhere.

          0 points
          • Mattan IngramMattan Ingram, 2 years ago

            Sure, why start with animations? Why not start with something no other popular tool has and is far more widely needed than animations.

            0 points
            • Andrew C, 2 years ago

              Studio is competing largely with Sketch, and Sketch doesn't offer animations out of the box. So the rationale might be that baking in animation provides a competitive advantage that Sketch doesn't have. Not a foolish strategy by any means.

              Whether that's the most important problem to solve; you may be right. I won't be the judge of that.

              0 points