Should designers code - why are we expected to learn coding & why we shouldn't?(medium.com)

over 4 years ago from Vipul. Mishra, Maker & founder of Visual Inspector @CanvasFlip Inc

  • Aaron Wears Many HatsAaron Wears Many Hats, over 4 years ago

    I don't quite get what you're asking. What's in it for the designer? Other than being a better employee, broadening your career opportunities and not isolating yourself from the rest of the team?

    As I mentioned above - knowing what can and can't be done with the technology in the budgets/timeframes allocated helps you draw up say an interface design that won't make the development team freak out. It also means that you can help share their load if you're in a smaller agency (where sometimes the designer might be otherwise sitting on their hands).

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    • John PJohn P, over 4 years ago

      This twitter thread on this echoes my thoughts on the matter https://twitter.com/_EricHu/status/841651275590717441

      Should designers learn to code? = how can we make developers jobs easier without expecting reciprocation while they make twice our salary

      So many articles about how you should let developers work at home because it takes 15 minutes to break concentration yadda yadda

      Ultimately everyone should learn as much about their coworkers jobs as possible, but I don't see no "should developers learn to design?"

      If you want your employers happy work hard to dispel the myth that only the engineering department matters

      "Designers learning to code" is always, ALWAYS about taking the tedious parts of an engineers job and responsibilities away and never about designers earning more skills and increasing their market value.

      Just to reiterate, this is my opinion AS a designer who is highly skilled in code too. So well aware of the benefits just also aware about design vs engineering and how the two are treated.

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