About the discussions we are not having. (Brainstorming)

over 2 years ago from Renato Castelo, Digital Product Designer

  • Adam Karpisz, over 2 years ago

    Great idea. Just ideas from the top of my head, based on observing other young designers and myself:

    • "You are the specialist" - being a designer is not that different from being an engineer or a car mechanic, yet where people tend not to argue with the design of an airplane before their flight, we hear "can we make it red? I like red" more often than we should. A designer needs to be the specialist in his field, his choices aren't (or shouldn't) be based on blind guesses, and more designers need to know how to play that role.

    • "How to know when to stop" - there's a saying: 80% on time is better than 100% late. Most of us know the feeling - a design is never "finished". There is always something to polish, some other path to explore. But there needs to be a moment when the design is ready to be submitted, even though it's not perfect. That moment needs to be a conscious choice, not "because the deadline was up".

    • "No man is an island"- you can design a logo by yourself. A whole corporate identity even. But at one point, designs become bigger than just one person. We need to swallow our ego and know how to include other people in the process.

    • "Be smart, not pretty" - function over form.

    • "The Juggler"- how to keep track of your work when you've taken on too much (I do it all the time ;) ).

    If anything else comes to mind, I'll be back here :)

    7 points
    • Renato CasteloRenato Castelo, over 2 years ago

      True! I lived a lot the "You are the specialist" problem. It was the main motivation behind diving deep into psychology and related areas.

      If more people contribute with this question, I will compile all the topics so we can find a way to exchange tips and tricks on them.

      0 points
    • Account deleted over 2 years ago

      "You are the specialist" - being a designer is not that different from being an engineer or a car mechanic, yet where people tend not to argue with the design of an airplane before their flight, we hear "can we make it red? I like red" more often than we should. A designer needs to be the specialist in his field, his choices aren't (or shouldn't) be based on blind guesses, and more designers need to know how to play that role.

      Be careful with this. A new designer is rarely - if ever - ever a specialist. Frankly, this is where I see many young designers fall down. They come out of school with an attitude that they know design, but aren't willing to pay their dues, apprentice or listen to important outside influences (ie: data, results, requirements, etc). They feel they simply know better.

      In the example you gave of a mechanic (or electricians, plumbers, etc), there is ALWAYS a pretty lengthy apprenticeship period where they follow, learn and grow for a few years. This used to be pretty standard in the old days, but has gotten a little lost recently.

      EDIT: The best way a young designer can get others to treat him/her like a specialist is to back up as many decisions as possible with experience or research. Being able to soundly back up design decisions is one of the best ways to earn the respect of co-workers AND get your ideas through much easier. I know someone who used to say"There are designers that might make a button yellow because it reminded them of that time they rolled around in a field of flowers and it made them feel so happy - and there are designers that make the button yellow because they can tell you it should result in a 10% lift in engagement from users based on testing and other trends you're seeing in the industry".

      6 points
      • Adam Karpisz, over 2 years ago

        Absolutely, great call out, it's important to underline this.

        Before "You are the specialist" there should be a "How to be a specialist" talk... although in a perfect world, that discussion would be a constant in all years of studying design... And this is also something I see as a problem: it's very easy to inflate an ego nowadays. Observe trends on Dribbble/Behance, follow them, get a lot of "likes", feel like an accomplished designer. All of that in less than a month. It can really fill a young mind with a false sense of accomplishment which then might block him from the most important aspect of being a designer - learning, be it from others or from personal experience.

        1 point