• Nelson TarucNelson Taruc, 3 years ago

    +1 what Marc said.

    The path of least nav resistance here is a tab bar with the 4 most used items first, and the 5th tab being "More" which leads to your overflow options -- but that's the lazy way out.

    If it were me, I'd push back hard on the product owner and kill as many of those nav items that aren't truly essential to delivering a great experience, or regroup them more wisely as Marc suggested.

    In my experience, when UX designers enable big bloated menu navs, that's usually a stepping stone to an unfocused and unpolished experience as product owners and customers start throwing additional "features" in.

    1 point
    • Marc EdwardsMarc Edwards, 3 years ago

      that's usually a stepping stone to an unfocused and unpolished experience

      Yeah. There’s definitely exceptions, but having 10 really, really important top level navigation items is a red flag, pointing to other potential issues that should be addressed.

      1 point