• Ryan Hicks, over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

    Le sigh... completely over your head. Not sure you even read my reply or are even paying attention to the subject here. The question is, "Should a designer have a portfolio site?" So YES ... as I said as someone who was recently searching for a job maintaining one is needed. Having a portfolio has everything to do with solving problems as it does indeed show the problems you've solved in the past.

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    • Ethan BondEthan Bond, over 5 years ago (edited over 5 years ago )

      I'll admit, I did forget that this was posing a question that references two tweets, not necessarily posing a question about the tweets. It seems like we actually might agree on most of this since you called out that Dropboxing it or whatever is fine. That's my only problem with "Should designers have a portfolio site: yes."

      The answer to "should designers ______" is pretty much always "it depends." There are circumstances where maintaining a portfolio site makes sense. There are also circumstances where it's a complete waste of time.

      If you're looking for a new job, you'll need some sort of presentable body of work, I agree. However, whether that's a website should be irrelevant, whether you've been regularly maintaining it or if you just threw it together as you updated your resume should be irrelevant, whether it's publicly accessible whatsoever should be irrelevant.

      My "portfolio site" contains no real portfolio. It doesn't mean I'm doing things wrong or I'm unemployable – just that it's not a priority for me (for a variety of reasons).

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      • Ryan Hicks, over 5 years ago

        Well, my point still stands. My "online" portfolio is 2 years old and is basically irrelevant. So when I was applying for new positions I would link them to a google drive link for an offline portfolio instead. Maintaining is a good idea if it's out there and you are referring people to it. But having a portfolio regardless of where it lives is a must as a designer.

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        • Ethan BondEthan Bond, over 5 years ago

          Sure, we agree then! I think your method is actually better than just having a public web portfolio. In part due to time commitment, but also because you can tailor it to each audience and you have the opportunity to provide additional context as necessary.

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          • Ryan Hicks, over 5 years ago

            Ya that's basically the situation I am in. I don't have the time to update it and maintain it. So I just send out links for them to download some screens and wireframes. Then we can have discussions around how I arrived to those solutions if they want further explanation. I did find that I ran into a couple of issues with this method. Some recruiters were not able to download them due to their internal IT restraints and had to pass it through their IT department for approval first, but that was only in two cases. So that's a con to this method albeit a rare case.

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