• Jay GrantJay Grant, 3 years ago

    Hi Nicholas. I really wanted to write a post that said "lol" but then I saw that you were actually interested in hearing other opinions and having a conversation about it––and I would have just been rude and mean. While, I disagree with your arguments, I just wanted to say that I really appreciate the civil conversation! Nice job internet.

    In my opinion, I don't think Apple has succeeded with every design choice, but the move away from metaphors is still a step in the right direction. For example, the current photos app icon is a bit silly to me, but the old one with a point and shoot camera and a physical photo is outdated and even more ridiculous. Moreover, can you imagine save button that still used a floppy disk?

    I do like the part where you discuss the removal of color from the Finder's sidebar. I find it significantly more difficult to use without the color, and I would love for Apple's designer to bring the color back. That said, I think Apple would be ecstatic if they could just get rid of Finder altogether and give us an alternative file system––or lack of tradition file system if you will. So perhaps they don't really care about the color here that much.

    1 point
    • Nicholas Windsor Howard, 3 years ago

      Hello, Grant.

      While, I disagree with your arguments, I just wanted to say that I really appreciate the civil conversation!

      I will always champion civil conversation. Thank you for doing the same.

      In my opinion, I don't think Apple has succeeded with every design choice, but the move away from metaphors is still a step in the right direction. For example, the current photos app icon is a bit silly to me, but the old one with a point and shoot camera and a physical photo is outdated and even more ridiculous. Moreover, can you imagine save button that still used a floppy disk?

      I have a rebuttal to your "floppy disk" argument: whether or not designers like this fact, such symbols as the floppy disk, the stamp or envelope for Mail, or the old-style telephone symbol for iOS's Phone app have accumulated meaning for many, many people over many, many years, and can accumulate new meanings for the young people who have never seen the objects to which they refer. Even if the very young among us did not recognize the reference to an old telephone in the Phone icon (although I would argue they would catch the reference), it would signify something new to them: the app called "Phone." Why would we switch to another, more "of-the-moment" symbol when we already have widely recognized ones capable of absorbing new meanings as they join the digital vocabulary?

      0 points