Why the Comment Section on Dribbble Sucks

5 years ago from Jonas Goth, Creative at Noak

  • Arix KingArix King, 5 years ago

    That's my big gripe with the platform too.

    I've actually been toying with the idea of making a design platform where critique is the focus. I figured a model where the comments would have a minimum length (no "Great work!" or "Nice" comments), disable links, and a voting system. That's to say, users could vote on whether they think the critique is actually sound or not; maybe not even show it to the designer who posted the work until after it has decent support?

    I think there's a lot of merit to the idea, but I'm struggling in knowing whether people would spend the time to critique other peoples work. Perhaps a "you got to provide a critique to get a critique" thing.

    Anyway, any ideas around this would be appreciated! I would actually love to start this!!

    8 points
    • Jonas S, 5 years ago

      Great idea!!

      8 points
      • Arix KingArix King, 5 years ago (edited 5 years ago )

        Very constructive, Jonas.

        *Edit: Darn, DN doesn't support the eye roll emoji.

        4 points
    • Connor NorvellConnor Norvell, 5 years ago

      Good work! But in all seriousness, I would love this

      3 points
      • Arix KingArix King, 5 years ago

        Thanks! The positive feedback is really motivating. I feel like this would be a great tool for freelance designers who don't have a big team to bounce ideas around or just anyone wanting an outside pair of eyes.

        2 points
        • Connor NorvellConnor Norvell, 5 years ago

          Agreed! the biggest pitfall would be, once too many people join it becomes over saturated, hard to get noticed, and everyone defaults to posting their work on every comment. But finding a clever solution around that would be your main selling point i think

          1 point
          • Arix KingArix King, 5 years ago

            Like disabling links in comments.

            As for saturation, I think that:

            • This wouldn't necessarily be a platform where you follow people, because seeing "cool" stuff isn't the point. The goal is to get and give feedback.

            • Getting noticed (i.e., critiqued) could be challenging, but—being that it's not a follow-based system, you could just curate un-critiqued works for each user to look at and provide feedback on.

            Additionally, to help with saturation, I would propose a point system so that you have to critique X times to have your work show up on the to-be-critiqued feed. And—of course—an invite system would be necessary to ensure critique quality.

            0 points
            • Connor NorvellConnor Norvell, 5 years ago

              I like it, basically "you scratch my back, Ill scratch yours" Digging it! tweet me when its up! lol

              2 points
    • Katelyn Caillouet, 5 years ago

      I really wanted something like this when I was working remotely. Something I'd suggest is a layer of privacy - maybe require accounts to view work? Some people are uncomfortable with showing unfinished/in-progress work which is probably why Dribbble resembles a highlight reel and not an illustration of process.

      1 point
      • Arix KingArix King, 5 years ago

        That makes sense. I think developing a culture around unfinished/work-in-progress work will be important for the value and community. Thanks!

        0 points
    • Chad Behnke, 5 years ago

      One thing you could maybe experiment with to illicit conversation and critique is to have the uploader provide both the image and like a "focus" for the critique - and both are required. "How does this color scheme make you feel?" "Does this interaction make sense?" "What do see in this logo?"Stuff like that.

      The downside of this is that you might lose some valuable feedback on some other part of the design that may need to be addressed, but it would give potential commenters a "jumping off" point and would break the ice, encouraging comments about improvement and removing the social barrier of not wanting to be negative toward the piece.

      1 point
      • Arix KingArix King, almost 5 years ago

        I think that's a great idea, Chad. I was already planning on having project breakdowns like target market, purpose & goals, etc. but I think the icebreaker could be useful.

        What if the comments had an empty state that prompted different questions for each user to target so that the feed back was more well rounded?

        0 points
    • Bryce HowitsonBryce Howitson, 5 years ago

      Sounds like a really cool idea. That said you need to find a way to mitigate the cost to reviewers. A good critique is expensive in terms of time spent to generate anything worthwhile. Let's say a solid critique takes 15min to understand the problem, 30min to type up your thoughts and 15min to find something you feel qualified to discuss... That's an hour of someone's time.

      Maybe it's worth looking at a compensation model of some kind. The idea behind codementor might make sense.

      That said, I would LOVE to collaborate with you on this idea. Gmail brycehowitson if you're interested.

      1 point
      • Arix KingArix King, 5 years ago

        Definitely agree—the exchange in value is probably the trickiest part of the problem. I like the idea of a codementor like model though.

        I'll shoot you an e-mail in a bit! Thanks!

        0 points
    • Cristian MoiseiCristian Moisei, 5 years ago

      There already are several communities based on feedback, like hunnie (if it's still working), Desinion or Critique, and the problem with all of them is that they attract a lot of amateurs, or in critique's case, non designers.

      And that's all fine, but it means there is no way for above average designers to learn.

      2 points
      • Arix KingArix King, 5 years ago

        I'm not surprised—no idea is original anymore! That said, I can only find the Desinion website. Any chance you could link the other two? I'd love to check them out.

        It looks like Desinion is a very optometrist approach ("One... or Two? One, Two?") I feel like a lot better critique could be provided with more information than visual comparison, which is ultimately aesthetically focused.

        I think an invite system would be a good solution for getting a skilled community.

        0 points
    • Kat WindleyKat Windley, 5 years ago

      I like this idea. Another point is that Dribble is just flat images or small animations, its pretty hard to get a sense of interaction and how the design will be used. It would be good to be able to get feedback on prototypes too.

      0 points