Design doesn't deserve a seat at the table(schloss.quora.com)

over 3 years ago from Rıza Selçuk Saydam, Product Designer on Messenger

  • Jake Lazaroff, over 3 years ago (edited over 3 years ago )

    The idea as I understood it isn't that "design" is just the visual part of things, but rather that if you haven't figured out some real value to bring to the table, "how it works" is still window dressing.

    In Designer Duds, the article to which this is a response, Mills Baker quotes an essay by Dave Morin of Path in which he says that to design a better bucket, we look to what's normal and identify problems. Baker follows this up by saying:

    To be clear: what’s needed isn’t plastic-covered buckets (or red-covered Facebooks). What’s needed is plumbing.

    On this point, I think this article and Designer Duds are in agreement. You can decide how it works, you can have the best UX, but ultimately if you're a designer building a better bucket when people want plumbing, then no, you don't deserve a "seat at the table". (Whatever that means).

    0 points
    • Carlos SousaCarlos Sousa, over 3 years ago

      Agree 100% with that. Same thing goes for any other business discipline. If you're doing something without the customer in mind well it's needless to say that your "solution" will probably hit the fan.

      What he failed to point out in his article is a CDO is as important as a CTO or a CFO. A business only has to gain when you have someone who understands how to do things for your customers.

      Lets look at companies in the 90's and their IT departments. People don't put up with crap and complicated interfaces, only if they really have no other choice (aka IRS submission) and medical interfaces.

      And talking about all those product failures like Carousel from Dropbox or Paper from Facebook, well lets take a look at all the entrepreneurs and see all their failed business attempts.

      What I want to say is, of course design is no magic pill to solve every business problem, but when a business considers design it has better chances of having a good product than one that doesn't consider it.

      0 points