Ray Luong

Ray Luong

San Francisco Product Designer @ Inkling Joined over 6 years ago

  • 15 stories
  • 8 comments
  • 41 upvotes
  • Posted to What questions do you ask a new employer?, Aug 18, 2014

    When we were interviewing for designers at DataPad, we appreciated candidates who showed a genuine interest in what they would work on. If you're already thinking about these questions, it's a good sign that you're truly curious about the position and company culture:

    • How would you see me best fitting into your team
    • How does the team make design decisions?
    • What gets you out of bed every day?
    • What will the company look like in 5 years?
    • What sort of problems will the company face in 5 years?
    • What are some of the hardest problems you're working on this week?
    • What does the team do for fun?
    • What's your working relationship like with your coworkers?
    • What kind of tradeoffs have you had to make recently?

    A brief article here: https://medium.com/designer-fund/interviewing-with-startups-tips-for-designers-106d8d2bf37b

    1 point
  • Posted to Curious how others deliver SPECS?, May 20, 2014

    It depends.

    We loosely follow Lean UX. So if a concept is still in its early stages, it's more effective for me to sketch an interaction on pen and paper and use that as an ephemeral spec.

    We use Confluence for more complex specs that we know are going to evolve over time.

    To show interactions using high fidelity mocks, we use Invision, which has been great so far since we can make quick click/hover prototypes and add comments directly on the screens.

    In terms of tools that spec exact visual dimensions, I haven't encountered much better than specctr. Though if you are working closely with your development team, I recommend crossing tools — developers should be familiar with and have access to your design tools. Our developers do this with the design tool we use Antetype. Our designers often build out components with CSS and send snippets.

    On that note, evolving style guides are effective and sustainable. Check out KSS. Our process at DataPad is evolving, but I see us using CSS to spec more and more.

    2 points
  • Posted to How to Criticize with Kindness ... Arguing Intelligently, Apr 25, 2014

    If I could give 5 upvotes, I would.

    3 points
  • Posted to What are the best tools to live-preview web pages?, Apr 13, 2014

    brackets.io has a live file preview in the browser that updates as you edit / save local files.

    4 points
  • Posted to Ask DN: What site do you guys use as a start page?, Feb 25, 2014

    I use Currently chrome extension by Rainfall https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/currently/ojhmphdkpgbibohbnpbfiefkgieacjmh?hl=en

    2 points
  • Posted to How designers can create interactive prototypes with Illustrator, Feb 20, 2014

    This is awesome. It's the best thing I've seen for prototyping using AI. My issues with it though:

    To me, it's a bit overkill for what you're doing in the example. - create a logical hierarchy in AI - name each element meaningfully - create js functions in html doc for basic ix like hovering

    Illustrator is a great tool for illustrating artwork and precise visual design, but it doesn't work very well yet for prototyping. There are faster and more efficient (i.e. code reuse, more control over animations and ix) ways for prototyping. Using HTML + CSS, you can easily make this same prototype in ~15 minutes and use the code for production. Quartz Composer has a bit of a learning curve, but once you get the hang of it, it gives you more control over animations. I'm currently using a visual tool called Antetype, which does not have transition ability, but the basic interactions like hovering or clicking are easy to build. It's like an advanced Omnigraffle.

    Also, I miss Fireworks.

    I'm looking forward to the day when we get the perfect tool for prototyping...

    0 points
  • Posted to Team communication app?, Feb 19, 2014

    Zulip

    Still early development, but we've found so much more focus in our work lately after moving from Hipchat. They allow you to create specific streams, subscribe, and mute. We're loving it so far.

    0 points
  • Posted to Khan Academy's Design Process, in reply to Jonathan Shariat , Feb 07, 2014

    =] I had some trouble too (Google Sites isn't design-centric), but I gleaned more from the actual content than proper font size and leading.

    0 points
Load more comments