26 comments

  • Pasquale D'SilvaPasquale D'Silva, 7 years ago

    So, blurry perspective shots with no context?

    18 points
    • Namanyay Goel, 7 years ago

      Haha :) I prefer putting up normal screenshots, but you correctly said that some people do it that way. But still, they only do blurry perspective shots on good work, right? :)

      Thanks for the comment!

      0 points
    • Seb JachecSeb Jachec, 7 years ago

      A series of shots like http://drbl.in/iCKo might be useful for Dribbblers right now..

      2 points
  • Paul MacgregorPaul Macgregor, 7 years ago

    Or you could just be a professional, do what you are paid to do, do it well and not really give a shit whether it fits neatly into a 600x400px box.

    12 points
    • Namanyay Goel, 7 years ago

      Hmm, it seems that my article is being taken in a wrong way. I personally post only my best work on Dribbble, and I'm sure a few others do too. What I meant with the article is that your work should be so well that you're okay with posting with Dribbble.

      Definitely, your aim shouldn't be to make things fit in 800*600 boxes :)

      Thanks for the comment!

      2 points
  • Bryant HughesBryant Hughes, 7 years ago

    Overall I'll agree with what your saying, but being a developer, sometimes I look at various shots and just laugh at how impractical they are from a technical point of view. Designing something flashy and over the top just to get likes on Dribbble overlooks the responsibility designers (should) have in designing something that is an effective solution to the problem at hand, but also can be built within the limits of the technology being used.

    6 points
    • Patrick KimPatrick Kim, 7 years ago

      Agreed. It's reminds me of architectural concepts that look cool but in reality are impractical, expensive and difficult to manufacture. Pushing boundaries is one thing but impractical circle jerk pieces are too frequent.

      2 points
    • Duncan ReganDuncan Regan, 7 years ago

      I really love the codepen builds of dribbble shots. It's nicer to see how something will work especially if it's not intended to be a static element.

      1 point
    • Namanyay Goel, 7 years ago

      Haha, I agree, especially the super-elaborate buttons. However, I'm a front-end dev myself, so I stay in practical limits. Thanks for the comment!

      0 points
  • Moeed MohammadMoeed Mohammad, 7 years ago

    I think this is the wrong perspective.

    Dribbble originally was made so we could share out WIPs and get feedback to make whatever we were working on better. Well, that was the idea anyways.

    Now, we're are under pressure to make stuff that will wow people on Dribbble, instead of wow-ing people we are supposed to. Our clients and customers.

    I haven't submitted anything to Dribbble in a while. It's not because my work isn't good enough, it's because Dribbble has become a shitty community where the majority just want to be heard or seen, or post absolutely meaningless comments.

    3 points
    • Namanyay Goel, 7 years ago

      I use Dribbble to just put up my best work - I agree on what you're saying about what it was and what it's come to be.

      Another user posted a great TL;DR - "Design like everyone's watching". I think that represents my post and intent the best.

      Thanks for your comment!

      0 points
  • Matthew Williams, 7 years ago (edited 7 years ago )

    Hopefully the past clients who paid for the lazy design don't read this.

    3 points
  • Joe CJoe C, 7 years ago

    I guess I agree with the sentiment you're putting forward here, but your example is not really illustrating this very well. The dribbble shot you referred to (http://dribbble.com/shots/1195854-UI-bits-from-a-simple-and-clean-form) is completely out of context, you can't understand what is going on let alone appreciate or critique the design.

    As Paul M. said, design like you are a professional.

    3 points
    • Namanyay Goel, 7 years ago

      I agree about that shot, it's pretty vague. I posted it after coming out of a huge creative block, so perhaps that's an excuse? :)

      I've replied to Paul M. with a better explanation about my article. Hopefully that will clear up some things.

      Thanks for commenting!

      0 points
  • Joseph PaquetteJoseph Paquette, 7 years ago

    I like the idea - but at the end of the day why would your motive be to design something for other designers?

    I think the real moral should be to design something YOU are proud of, not something that will make the users of dribbble happy. And, if the only way you are able to be proud of something is if it gets good response on dribbble, I think you might be in the wrong mindset. Do you think the great designers before the times of dribbble (or even interwebs) were designing with their competition in mind? Just food for thought.

    2 points
    • Namanyay Goel, 7 years ago

      I personally don't use Dribbble to impress or please other designers - I use it as a collection of my best work. Yes, there is a slight factor of what other designers will say, but I primarily aim to post something that I myself am proud of.

      Thanks for your comment!

      0 points
  • Andy OrsowAndy Orsow, 7 years ago

    The thing about dribbble is that social pressure exists, which can encourage extra care in your work, or just burn you out comparing yourself to other designers. At it's worst It's a game, you try to climb the ladders by getting likes and posting flashy shots. Which is why so many people are getting burnt out on it and are pissed off by it. But I understand what you're saying here, more power to you.

    2 points
    • Namanyay Goel, 7 years ago

      Thank you! I agree to that, but I use Dribbble not to please other designers, but as a showcase of my best work.

      0 points
  • Martin LeBlancMartin LeBlanc, 7 years ago

    The problem with dribbble is that there is too much focus on look'n'feel of the design. Most users gives very few fucks. What really matter is the interaction design and in the end, the value that users can get from using the site/app.

    0 points
  • Shawn BorskyShawn Borsky, 7 years ago

    I really dig Dribbble. I'm probably not the only one but 99% of the time it is not appropriate for me to show my WIP online. Client privacy and all. I tend to end up posting personal work or finished work that's already out in the wild. But only if it happens to lend to being bite-sized.

    Either way, maybe just design what's best for your customer?

    0 points
    • Namanyay Goel, 7 years ago

      Great points, I agree! Same happens with me and client work, I post WIPs of only personal projects.

      Thanks for your comment!

      0 points
  • Will FroelichWill Froelich, 7 years ago

    Speaking of Dribbble. Anyone have an invite :) http://dribbble.com/fform

    0 points