7 comments

  • Erik Fanki, 3 days ago

    Who needs neomorphism? To me, it seems to be pushed by designers who want to create eye-candy, and getting likes on Dribbble. It has terrible accessibility support in terms of contrast and clarity, and hover states vs active states are in general incredibly confusing. Show me a convincing user testing of neomorphism improving anything in an interface.. And I'll be all for it.

    2 points
    • , 3 days ago

      Yea, I am aware of the accessibility issues. I also wrote in the article about not fully recommending neumorphism. But here's a website that became product of the day on PH (https://super.so/) using neumorphism. If neumorphism does become a more widely used design trend (which I don't think it can become tbh) for accessibility you could add an option for the website to disable the shadows and improve color contrasts for instance.

      0 points
      • Thomas Michael SemmlerThomas Michael Semmler, 3 days ago

        its is not wise to treat producthunt as a compass needle for anything really. If anything it shows you what a very specific audience in a bubble is believing. Users are entirely excluded from this.

        What you are actually saying here, and that is neomorphism is a googleable keyword that will generate traffic to this product, of which you are the CEO of.

        1 point
        • , 3 days ago

          Fair enough. We also created the Neumorphism UI Kit with the thought that this trend will generate traffic and interest regardless of whether it will be widely used or not. We also had fun doing it. But this is most likely our last time we publish anything about neumorphism, whether it's an article or product.

          0 points
          • Erik Fanki, 3 days ago

            Glad to hear it you had a good time! Now, I'm not looking to spread negativity just because. The problem that I sometimes face are clients who have seen something "cool" on Behance or Dribbble with 20 gradients, triple drop shadows and buttons that are unusable. From that, they want an app/site/service looking just like it.

            Their misjudgement lies in that they think "sexy" UI wins users and makes them happy. It doesn't. Maybe initially – just like people I guess. ;) But when we start introducing new interaction patterns, people will get confused. And I have then have to argue why sexiness in UI is not good UX because the users will get frustrated when things don't behave like they expect. You can call me a UI conservative. People (except other designers maybe) will never love a designers button - they will love what the service can do for them.

            Now, if fun is your drive here, go nuts with the neumorphism!

            All the best, Erik

            3 points
  • Florian BauernfeindFlorian Bauernfeind, 3 hours ago

    Please stop this ugly, unusable trend. If you don't recommend using this style, why making a tutorial though?

    0 points
    • , 1 hour ago

      Because people search for it and are interested. If I don't do it, someone else will write the tutorial (there are lots of them anyways). Actually I can recommend neumorphism for art related or futuristic types of websites, I don't recommend it to be used for everything. It's more like a niche trend of sorts.

      0 points