• Nancy TsangNancy Tsang, 7 years ago

    What was the reasoning behind the main navigation to not shrink down with the rest of the page? At smaller sizes, it shows a horizontal scroll bar, and a fixed arrow image appears on the right (which doesn't function as a 'scroll to the right' button)- instead it echoes the same meaning as the horizontal scroll bar that theres more to see, and obscures the last item in the nav ('Contact'). I feel like there's a disconnect between the RWD of the content and the non-RWD approach towards the navigation.

    1 point
    • Jeff EscalanteJeff Escalante, 7 years ago

      I certainly can't speak for the whole team, but I think our general reasoning was that it made it more accessible. Shrinking it down isn't an option, because we have too many to fit horizontally at a reasonable size. Changing it to one of those pancake stack icons and requiring two clicks was something we weren't super into. Changing it to a vertical stack without a pancake icon feels a little too hefty on the vertical space front for a header. Although we are aware that it's sort of a different UI pattern, we were hoping that people would pick it up.

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      • Nancy TsangNancy Tsang, 7 years ago

        I suppose what one considers a reasonable size can be subjective (as long as it's big enough to comfortably tap on mobile?), but I think it could have been possible to shrink your horizontal nav items. For example, http://skinnyties.com/ has 10 different items in its nav, but they scale the font-size down and replace a few links with icons. Carrot's got 8 items, and while your font-size doesn't scale down, your 'Contact' link changes from a graphic at larger sizes to a text-link on mobile, curiously enough.

        Anyhow, I'm glad to hear your thinking behind why you nixed different mobile nav solutions. It's definitely a challenge to create a great responsive menu, and I'm sure future redesigns will only continue to improve with more trial-and-error experiences.

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